Cover image for Warp speed : America in the age of mixed media
Title:
Warp speed : America in the age of mixed media
Author:
Kovach, Bill.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : Century Foundation Press, 1999.
Physical Description:
xi, 193 pages ; 23 cm
General Note:
"A Century Foundation report."
Language:
English
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780870784361

9780870784378
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library PN4888.P6 K68 1999 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
Searching...

On Order

Summary

Summary

Did the coverage of the Clinton-Lewinsky scandal set a new low for American journalism? How has news gathering and reporting changed, and what effects has this had on the political and cultural landscape? In this insightful and thoughtful book, Bill Kovach and Tom Rosenstiel, two of America's leading press watchers, explore the new culture of news--what they call the new Mixed Media Culture--and show how it works.Warp Speed describes a world of news in which the speed of delivery is reducing the time for verification, sources are gaining more leverage over the news, and argument is overwhelming reporting. The press, forced to adhere to the demands of the bottom line and keep its audience, is straining more and more to find the Big Story to package as a form of entertainment, turning news stories into TV dramas; and turning history into a kind of Truman Show. As a result, the role of the press in a self-governing society is undermined.Grounded in extensive research, Warp Speed is informed by interviews and testimony from the principal journalists who covered this story and who covered the other great scandals of Washington politics. It offers detailed recommendations on how journalists can right their ship, such as using anonymous sources more responsibly and turning good journalism into good business.


Summary

Did the coverage of the Clinton-Lewinsky scandal set a new low for American journalism? How has news gathering and reporting changed, and what effects has this had on the political and cultural landscape? In this insightful and thoughtful book, Bill Kovach and Tom Rosenstiel, two of America's leading press watchers, explore the new culture of news--what they call the new Mixed Media Culture--and show how it works. Warp Speed describes a world of news in which the speed of delivery is reducing the time for verification, sources are gaining more leverage over the news, and argument is overwhelming reporting. The press, forced to adhere to the demands of the bottom line and keep its audience, is straining more and more to find the Big Story to package as a form of entertainment, turning news stories into TV dramas; and turning history into a kind of Truman Show. As a result, the role of the press in a self-governing society is undermined. Grounded in extensive research, Warp Speedis informed by interviews and testimony from the principal journalists who covered this story and who covered the other great scandals of Washington politics. It offers detailed recommendations on how journalists can right their ship, such as using anonymous sources more responsibly and turning good journalism into good business.


Author Notes

Bill Kovach was formerly the Washington bureau chief of The New York Times . He curates the Nieman Foundation at Harvard University and co-founded and serves as chairman of the Committee of Concerned Journalists. Tom Rosenstiel is director of the Project for Excellence in Journalism.


Bill Kovach was formerly the Washington bureau chief of The New York Times . He curates the Nieman Foundation at Harvard University and co-founded and serves as chairman of the Committee of Concerned Journalists. Tom Rosenstiel is director of the Project for Excellence in Journalism.


Reviews 2

Choice Review

The authors (members of The Committee of Concerned Journalists, which studies the evolving changes in the relationships among the news media, the government, and the public) offer an insightful, well-balanced critical analysis of present-day news media measured by a snapshot of the news-media culture in the first week of the Clinton-Lewinsky story. Their goal was to find out what the news media were actually providing audiences: how much was factual reporting, what the sources were, how much was analytical and how much punditry (i.e., opinion, speculation, and judgment). The authors discovered that the "old journalism"--careful investigation, reliable sources, factual accuracy--was gone, replaced by a diversified mass media in which the cultures of entertainment, infotainment, argument, analysis, tabloid, and mainstream press not only work side by side but also merge. Operating at warp speed, new technologies inundate audiences with unsorted, unstructured infotainment that diverts attention from real events and issues. Half of the book comprises appendixes of data, graphs, charts, and excerpts from media checked against the facts in the Starr report. These provide well-documented, easy-to-understand details and analysis that support the authors' claims. Required reading for all students and practitioners of journalism and for news editors and managers. R. Cathcart; CUNY Queens College


Choice Review

The authors (members of The Committee of Concerned Journalists, which studies the evolving changes in the relationships among the news media, the government, and the public) offer an insightful, well-balanced critical analysis of present-day news media measured by a snapshot of the news-media culture in the first week of the Clinton-Lewinsky story. Their goal was to find out what the news media were actually providing audiences: how much was factual reporting, what the sources were, how much was analytical and how much punditry (i.e., opinion, speculation, and judgment). The authors discovered that the "old journalism"--careful investigation, reliable sources, factual accuracy--was gone, replaced by a diversified mass media in which the cultures of entertainment, infotainment, argument, analysis, tabloid, and mainstream press not only work side by side but also merge. Operating at warp speed, new technologies inundate audiences with unsorted, unstructured infotainment that diverts attention from real events and issues. Half of the book comprises appendixes of data, graphs, charts, and excerpts from media checked against the facts in the Starr report. These provide well-documented, easy-to-understand details and analysis that support the authors' claims. Required reading for all students and practitioners of journalism and for news editors and managers. R. Cathcart; CUNY Queens College


Google Preview