Cover image for Our stars
Title:
Our stars
Author:
Rockwell, Anne F.
Personal Author:
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
San Diego : Silver Whistle/Harcourt Brace & Co., [1999]

©1999
Physical Description:
1 volume (unpaged) : color illustrations ; 24 cm
Summary:
A simple introduction to the stars, planets, and outer space.
Language:
English
Reading Level:
AD 460 Lexile.
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR LG 2.9 0.5 51320.

Reading Counts RC K-2 2.7 1 Quiz: 32606 Guided reading level: K.
ISBN:
9780152018689
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Item Holds
Searching...
QB801.7 .R63 1999 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
Searching...
Searching...
QB801.7 .R63 1999 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
Searching...
Searching...
QB801.7 .R63 1999 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
Searching...
Searching...
QB801.7 .R63 1999 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
Searching...
Searching...
QB801.7 .R63 1999 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
Searching...
Searching...
QB801.7 .R63 1999 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
Searching...
Searching...
QB801.7 .R63 1999 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
Searching...
Searching...
QB801.7 .R63 1999 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
Searching...
Searching...
QB801.7 .R63 1999 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
Searching...

On Order

Summary

Summary

Every night many twinkling stars appear in the wide sky. From the earth below, we can see the glowing moon, and sometimes even a bright meteor shooting through space. With gentle text and luminous watercolors, Anne Rockwell brings the distant heavens a little closer.


Author Notes

Anne Rockwell was born in Memphis, Tennessee on February 8, 1934. She moved to New York City at the age of 18 and found a job doing typing work for a textbook publisher. She studied at Pratt Graphic Arts Center and at the Sculpture Center.

She became an author and illustrator. Her first children's book, Paul and Arthur Search for the Egg, was published in 1964. Her other books included Boats, Fire Engines, Things That Go, Our Earth, and Only Passing Through: The Story of Sojourner Truth. She collaborated on several books with her husband Harlow Rockwell including Sally's Caterpillar and The Toolbox. After her husband's death, she collaborated with her daughter Lizzy Rockwell. Their books included Career Day and Zoo Day. She died of natural causes on April 10, 2018 at the age of 85.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 2

Booklist Review

Ages 4^-9. In her signature style, with short sentences and big, clear gouache-and-silkscreen pictures, Rockwell introduces facts about stars, planets, comets, and meteors, one step at a time. Pictures of preschoolers learning about the universe (looking through a telescope, watching a comet streak through the sky) alternate with simple diagrams, including a double-page spread of the solar system and an outline of the Big Dipper pointing to the North Star. Some of the concepts are difficult for young children ("Some stars are so far away that their fire has burned out by the time the brightness reaches us"), but Rockwell avoids overwhelming abstraction. This is a book for adults to talk about with children, alone or in groups, to raise big questions and open up discussion about the wonder of the universe and how we try to find out about it. --Hazel Rochman


School Library Journal Review

PreS-Gr 1-Rockwell begins and ends with stars, but in between attempts to inform children about planets, meteors, comets, and moons. Given that there are only 22 pages of text, with 3 short sentences per page at most, it's an impossible task. The author's trademark artwork in bright colors is eye-catching but really doesn't amplify the all-too-brief narrative. Beneath a painting depicting the constellation Orion readers are told, "When we see Orion the Hunter in the sky, we know it is the season to harvest what we planted." Given that Orion is visible from October to March, that's a long harvest season. Rockwell states, "Streaks of light that look like faraway fireworks are meteors. We call them shooting stars." Fine, but what are they really, and what are children to make of the statement that, "Some stars are so far away that their fire has burned out by the time the brightness reaches us?" In an effort to provide an introduction to the young, Rockwell has simplified too much. Gail Gibbons's Stargazers (Holiday, 1992) is a better choice for this age group.-Elaine Fort Weischedel, Turner Free Library, Randolph, MA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.