Cover image for Little Bunny's sleepless night
Title:
Little Bunny's sleepless night
Author:
Roth, Carol.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : North South Books, [1999]

©1999
Physical Description:
1 volume (unpaged) : color illustrations ; 29 cm
Summary:
Little Bunny, an only child, is so lonely that he cannot sleep, so he asks his friends Squirrel, Skunk, Porcupine, Bear, and Owl if he can stay with them, only to discover that his own bed is best.
Language:
English
Reading Level:
490 Lexile.
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR LG 3.0 0.5 36433.

Reading Counts RC K-2 4.2 2 Quiz: 14470 Guided reading level: L.
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780735810693

9780735810709
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Item Holds
Searching...
PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
Searching...
Searching...
PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
Searching...
Searching...
X Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
Searching...
Searching...
PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
Searching...

On Order

Summary

Summary

Little Bunny, an only child, is so lonely that he cannot sleep, so he asks his friends Squirrel, Skunk, Porcupine, Bear, and Owl if he can stay with them, only to discover that his own bed is best.


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

Ages 3^-5. With no siblings to share his room, Little Bunny sometimes gets lonely at night. So one evening Bunny hops over to Squirrel's house to spend the night, but Squirrel likes a midnight snack of acorns and his crunching keeps Bunny awake. Bunny successively samples the hospitality of his many friends, but Skunk gets startled and sprays, Porcupine's bed bristles with stray quills, Bear snores, and Owl stays up reading. When a by-now-exhausted Bunny urges Owl to turn out the light, his wise friend advises him to return home to his own bed, where, of course, Bunny falls fast asleep. This straightforward story charms with its simplicity and engaging artwork awash in pastel hues. Gorbachev etches humor and delight into each droll illustration; for example, Little Bunny's rag doll bunny is tucked tidily into each bed, Squirrel's bent twig bed frames are the height of fashion, and Owl's treetop, chandelier-lit abode is comfortably cluttered with books. This sweet bedtime story will prove a favorite with children and parents alike. --Ellen Mandel


Publisher's Weekly Review

Like Goldilocks trying out successive porridge servings, chairs and beds until she finds the one that is just right, so Little Bunny, an "only" rabbit faced with loneliness at bedtime, hops away from home in search of "the company of a good friend." Welcomed with open arms wherever he goes, he nevertheless finds that the accommodations never quite measure upÄSquirrel's place is too noisy, what with all the nut-cracking, Skunk's is too smelly, Porcupine's too prickly and so on. In the end, he returns eagerly to his own bed for some proper shut-eye. Roth's (Whose Mess Is This?) breezy style is right on target for this merry bedtime tale, which also serves as a gentle reminder to nocturnal migrants that there truly is no place like one's own bed. Gorbachev's (Nicky and the Big Bad Wolves) pen-and-ink and watercolor artwork has a homespun coziness, which is amplified by his busy use of line and crosshatching. Generously tinted with humor, the illustrations radiate security as they offer up a cheerful menagerie of animal friends decked out in pajamas. This picture book scores high points on the snuggle scale and is just the ticket for the train to Nod. Ages 4-7. (Mar.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

PreS-K-"Little Bunny had no brothers or sisters. He had his very own room with his very own bed." One night, he is so lonely that he can't sleep, and he goes in search of company. First he stays with Squirrel, who crunches acorns loudly in the middle of the night. Then, he goes to Skunk, who forgets he has company and sprays; and finally, after a few more stopovers, he shows up at the door of Owl, who keeps the light burning way too late. Owl tells Little Bunny, "I stay up reading every night. That's how I got to be so wise" and gives the sleepy fellow some good advice for a predictable yet satisfying ending. The story and artwork are loaded with child appeal. The plot has a good rhythm to it, with a gentle echo of the loneliness some children may feel all alone in a big bed. The pictures are done in soft colors and scratchy yet supple lines to create a nighttime world of endearing animals. This book isn't likely to win any major awards but it will get repeated bedtime readings in lots of households.-Lauralyn Persson, Wilmette Public Library, IL (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.