Cover image for Here is the African savanna
Title:
Here is the African savanna
Author:
Dunphy, Madeleine.
Personal Author:
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
New York : Hyperion Books for Children, [1999]

©1999
Physical Description:
1 volume (unpaged) : illustrations (some color) ; 22 x 26 cm
Summary:
Cumulative text describes the interdependence among the plants and animals of an African savanna.
Language:
English
Reading Level:
BR Lexile.
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR LG 5.1 0.5 41964.

Reading Counts RC K-2 3.1 2 Quiz: 29056 Guided reading level: L.
ISBN:
9780786801626

9780786821341
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Clearfield Library QH194 .D86 1999 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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East Aurora Library QH194 .D86 1999 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Hamburg Library QH194 .D86 1999 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Orchard Park Library QH194 .D86 1999 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Anna M. Reinstein Library QH194 .D86 1999 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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On Order

Summary

Summary

Giraffes, lions, hippos, elephants, and many more animals are part of the food web of the African savanna. Through cumulative verse, the sixth title in the acclaimed Here Is series shows young readers how all living things in this important ecological community rely on one another for their existence. Luminous paintings capture the untamed beauty of the African plains.


Reviews 1

Booklist Review

Ages 3^-8. Part of the Here Is series, this simple cumulative story both shows and tells the interaction of plants and animals on the east African savanna. One at a time, the clear, acrylic double-page pictures and the rhythmic words focus on a particular plant or animal, first close-up and then as part of the wide grassland environment. ("Here are the hippos / who are groomed by the tick birds / who perch on the impalas / who eat the pods / dropped by the baboons / who sit in the tree / which shelters the giraffe . . ."). Each new page takes a surprising leap, though those who look closely at each picture will see a hint of what's to come. The repetition is never boring, and children will enjoy the active verbs and the handsome pictures of the astonishing wildlife. A final double-page spread discusses the animals that are in danger of extinction and makes a plea to help ensure their survival. --Hazel Rochman


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