Cover image for Rooted in America : foodlore of popular fruits and vegetables
Title:
Rooted in America : foodlore of popular fruits and vegetables
Author:
Wilson, David Scofield.
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
Knoxville : University of Tennessee Press, [1999]

©1999
Physical Description:
xiii, 239 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
Language:
English
Contents:
Apples / Boria Sax -- Bananas / Virginia S. Jenkins -- Corn / Theresa Meléndez -- Cranberries / Angus Kress Gillespie -- Hot peppers / David Scofield Wilson -- Oranges / Jay Mechling -- Pumpkins / Tad Tuleja -- Tobacco / C.W. Sullivan III -- Tomatoes / David Scofield Wilson -- Watermelons / Patricia A. Turner.
ISBN:
9781572330580

9781572330481

9781572330528

9781572330535
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library GR105 .R66 1999 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Summary

Summary

In Women Called to Witness, Nancy A. Hardesty locates the roots of American feminism in the evangelical revivals that emerged during the Second Great Awakening of the early nineteenth century. She thus challenges the conventional wisdom that any movement for women's rights is a secular one because religion is inherently oppressive toward women. First published in 1984 and now revised and updated, this book focuses particularly on the followers of Charles Grandison Finney, an evangelist whose revivals spread from upstate New York eastward to New England and westward to Ohio. The author shows that in Finney's brand of revivalism, personal and social salvation were inseparably linked, and thus the evangelical strategies used in spreading the Christian gospel were readily adapted to various social crusades, including temperance, abolition, and eventually suffrage. Hardesty shows that such leaders as Frances Willard, Sarah and Angelina Grimke, Lucy Stone, and Elizabeth Cady Stanton all had links to the Finneyite,revivals. All were active in the various reforms the revivals spawned.

In exploring these women's lives and their religious involvements, Hardesty demonstrates how bonds of sisterhood were forged and how those bonds nurtured the quest for equality, in the home, the church, and society.


Summary

"This briskly written study is packed with useful information on the history of nineteenth-century social reform in general, and the role of evangelical men and women in the formation of an articulate women's movement in particular."--Grant Wacker, The Christian Century (on the first edition)

In Women Called to Witness, Nancy A. Hardesty locates the roots of American feminism in the evangelical revivals that emerged during the Second Great Awakening of the early nineteenth century. She thus challenges the conventional wisdom that any movement for women's rights is a secular one because religion is inherently oppressive toward women.

First published in 1984 and now revised and updated, this book focuses particularly on the followers of Charles Grandison Finney, an evangelist whose revivals spread from upstate New York eastward to New England and westward to Ohio. The author shows that in Finney's brand of revivalism, personal and social salvation were inseparably linked, and thus the evangelical strategies used in spreading the Christian gospel were readily adapted to various social crusades, including temperance, abolition, and eventually suffrage. Hardesty shows that such leaders as Frances Willard, Sarah and Angelina Grimk#65533;, Lucy Stone, and Elizabeth Cady Stanton all had links to the Finneyite revivals. All were active in the various reforms the revivals spawned.

In exploring these women's lives and their religious involvements, Hardesty demonstrates how bonds of sisterhood were forged and how those bonds nurtured the quest for equality in the home, the church, and society.

The Author: Nancy A. Hardesty is associate professor of religion at Clemson University. She is a founder of the Evangelical and Ecumenical Women's Caucus.


Summary

From the exotic appeal of oranges to the joy of home-grown tomatoes, many fruits and vegetables have come to play key roles in our gardening, cooking, and eating habits. This book explores ten familiar cultivars -- apples, bananas, corn, cranberries, peppers, oranges, pumpkins, tobacco, tomatoes, and watermelons -- to show how they have become intimately entwined with the American way of life.

Through recipes and superstitions, jokes and urban legends, history and advertising, these foods have become unmistakably part of our popular culture. We might attend a county fair and see a blue ribbon awarded to a prize pumpkin, then take in a movie that evening where we see a cigarette dangling from Humphrey Bogart's lips or even witness The Attack of the Killer Tomatoes. Whether native or exotic, consumed daily or associated with festivities, these common comestibles have become food for thought as well as for sustenance.

Rooted in America examines how these foods express our cultural values and carry meanings that derive from the contexts in which we place them. It offers a tour of the apple in American history and consciousness, from Johnny Appleseed to mass production; tells how fruit companies taught North Americans to eat bananas while teaching Central Americans to grow them; examines differing social status attached to eating corn; explores the aesthetic contribution of cranberries to plate and landscape; and reveals how hot peppers separate men from boys -- and also European from non-European cultures.

All of the essays show how these foods have slipped into our minds and hearts as symbols of what we value about ourselves and the places we live. Rooted in America will delightreaders with its insights into favorite foods -- proving that, no matter what their origins


Summary

From the exotic appeal of oranges to the joy of home-grown tomatoes, many fruits and vegetables have come to play key roles in our gardening, cooking, and eating habits. This book explores ten familiar cultivars--apples, bananas, corn, cranberries, peppers, oranges, pumpkins, tobacco, tomatoes, and watermelons--to show how they have become intimately entwined with the American way of life.

Through recipes and superstitions, jokes and urban legends, history and advertising, these foods have become unmistakably part of our popular culture. We might attend a county fair and see a blue ribbon awarded to a prize pumpkin, then take in a movie that evening where we see a cigarette dangling from Humphrey Bogart's lips or even witness The Attack of the Killer Tomatoes. Whether native or exotic, consumed daily or associated with festivities, these common comestibles have become food for  thought as well as for sustenance.

Rooted in America examines how these foods express our cultural values and carry meanings that derive from the contexts in which we place them. It offers a tour of the apple in American history and consciousness, from Johnny Appleseed to mass production; tells how fruit companies taught North Americans to eat bananas while teaching Central Americans to grow them; examines differing social status attached to eating corn; explores the aesthetic contribution of cranberries to plate and landscape; and reveals how hot peppers separate men from boys--and also European from non-European cultures.
All of the essays show how these foods have slipped into our minds and hearts as symbols of what we value about ourselves and the places we live. Rooted in America will delight readers with its insights into favorite foods--proving that, no matter what their origins, all are as American as apple pie.

David Scofield Wilson is emeritus professor and former director of American studies at the University of California, Davis, and author of In the Presence of Nature.

Angus Kress Gillespie is associate professor of American studies at Rutgers University and coeditor of American Wildlife in Symbol and Story, also from Tennessee.

Contributors:  Angus Kress Gillespie, Virginia S. Jenkins, Jay Mechling, Theresa Meléndez, Boria Sax, C. W. Sullivan III, Tad Tuleja, Patricia Turner, David Scofield Wilson.


Author Notes

The Author: Nancy A. Hardesty is associate professor of religion at Clemson University. She is a founder of the Evangelical and Ecumenical Women's Caucus.


David Scofield Wilson is emeritus professor and former director of American studies at the University of California, Davis, and author of In the Presence of Nature.

Angus Kress Gillespie is associate professor of American studies at Rutgers University and coeditor of American Wildlife in Symbol and Story, also from Tennessee.




Reviews 4

Booklist Review

These 10 essays by nine writers explore the cultural impact on our society of 10 native cultivars: apples, bananas, corn, cranberries, hot peppers, oranges, pumpkins, tobacco, tomatoes, and watermelons. All are important in cooking, decorative arts, gardening, and festivities. Johnny Appleseed is a pioneer hero and the patron saint of apples; actress and singer Carmen Miranda was famous for wearing a huge fruit-bowl hat containing bananas; and the top hit song of 1923 was "Yes! We Have No Bananas." Corn brings to mind corn oil, cornflakes, popcorn (and movies), and caramel corn (as in Cracker Jack). There are cranberries at Thanksgiving; hot peppers spice up much of our cooking; and oranges plus sunshine plus beaches equals women in bikinis. There are pumpkins and jack-o'lanterns on Halloween, and we have the famous cult film Attack of the Killer Tomatoes. There are watermelon-eating contests and watermelon festivals all summer long. And tobacco--we'll always remember the films of Humphrey Bogart with the cigarette dangling from his lips. This book is a small gem--a delight to read. --George Cohen


Choice Review

Each essay in this collection deals with the role of a different cultivated plant in American culture. The fruits and vegetables discussed are apples (B. Sax), bananas (V.S. Jenkins), corn (T. Melendez), cranberries (A.K. Gillespie), hot peppers (D.S. Wilson), oranges (J. Mechling), pumpkins (T. Tuleja), tobacco (C.W. Sullivan III.), tomatoes (D.S. Wilson), and watermelons (F.A. Turner). There is no other collection quite like this, although certain agricultural products have been dealt with separately in similar fashion but in much greater depth. This volume follows the same format as American Wildlife in Symbol and Story, ed. by Angus Gillespie and Jay Mechling (CH, Feb'88), a collection on "totemic" animals in American culture, and it includes essays by five of the same contributors. There is no introduction, conclusion, or other attempt at generalization or summation. Each chapter is left to stand on its own. Although each is interesting and informative, there is unfortunately great disparity in how the subjects are handled. Some, like "Apples," are comprehensive, carrying the reader from Johnny Appleseed and Garden of Eden imagery to Macintosh computers and Alar. Others take a much narrower view: "Bananas" is mostly about marketing strategies; "Corn" consists almost entirely of a diatribe against European biases regarding it. All levels. W. G. Lockwood; University of Michigan


Booklist Review

These 10 essays by nine writers explore the cultural impact on our society of 10 native cultivars: apples, bananas, corn, cranberries, hot peppers, oranges, pumpkins, tobacco, tomatoes, and watermelons. All are important in cooking, decorative arts, gardening, and festivities. Johnny Appleseed is a pioneer hero and the patron saint of apples; actress and singer Carmen Miranda was famous for wearing a huge fruit-bowl hat containing bananas; and the top hit song of 1923 was "Yes! We Have No Bananas." Corn brings to mind corn oil, cornflakes, popcorn (and movies), and caramel corn (as in Cracker Jack). There are cranberries at Thanksgiving; hot peppers spice up much of our cooking; and oranges plus sunshine plus beaches equals women in bikinis. There are pumpkins and jack-o'lanterns on Halloween, and we have the famous cult film Attack of the Killer Tomatoes. There are watermelon-eating contests and watermelon festivals all summer long. And tobacco--we'll always remember the films of Humphrey Bogart with the cigarette dangling from his lips. This book is a small gem--a delight to read. --George Cohen


Choice Review

Each essay in this collection deals with the role of a different cultivated plant in American culture. The fruits and vegetables discussed are apples (B. Sax), bananas (V.S. Jenkins), corn (T. Melendez), cranberries (A.K. Gillespie), hot peppers (D.S. Wilson), oranges (J. Mechling), pumpkins (T. Tuleja), tobacco (C.W. Sullivan III.), tomatoes (D.S. Wilson), and watermelons (F.A. Turner). There is no other collection quite like this, although certain agricultural products have been dealt with separately in similar fashion but in much greater depth. This volume follows the same format as American Wildlife in Symbol and Story, ed. by Angus Gillespie and Jay Mechling (CH, Feb'88), a collection on "totemic" animals in American culture, and it includes essays by five of the same contributors. There is no introduction, conclusion, or other attempt at generalization or summation. Each chapter is left to stand on its own. Although each is interesting and informative, there is unfortunately great disparity in how the subjects are handled. Some, like "Apples," are comprehensive, carrying the reader from Johnny Appleseed and Garden of Eden imagery to Macintosh computers and Alar. Others take a much narrower view: "Bananas" is mostly about marketing strategies; "Corn" consists almost entirely of a diatribe against European biases regarding it. All levels. W. G. Lockwood; University of Michigan


Table of Contents

David Scofield WilsonBoria SaxVirginia S. JenkinsTheresa MelendezAngus Kress GillespieDavid Scofield WilsonJay MechlingTad TulejaC. W. Sullivan IIIDavid Scofield WilsonPatricia A. TurnerDavid Scofield WilsonBoria SaxVirginia S. JenkinsTheresa MelendezAngus Kress GillespieDavid Scofield WilsonJay MechlingTad TulejaC. W. Sullivan IIIDavid Scofield WilsonPatricia A. Turner
Prefacep. xi
1. Applesp. 1
2. Bananasp. 23
3. Cornp. 40
4. Cranberriesp. 60
5. Hot Peppersp. 89
6. Orangesp. 120
7. Pumpkinsp. 142
8. Tobaccop. 166
9. Tomatoesp. 188
10. Watermelonsp. 211
Contributorsp. 225
Indexp. 227
Prefacep. xi
1. Applesp. 1
2. Bananasp. 23
3. Cornp. 40
4. Cranberriesp. 60
5. Hot Peppersp. 89
6. Orangesp. 120
7. Pumpkinsp. 142
8. Tobaccop. 166
9. Tomatoesp. 188
10. Watermelonsp. 211
Contributorsp. 225
Indexp. 227

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