Cover image for The all-new Amelia
The all-new Amelia
Moss, Marissa.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Middleton, WI : American Girl, 1999.
Physical Description:
1 volume (unpaged) : color illustrations ; 26 cm
Hoping to impress the new girl in her class while they work together on an archeological dig project, Ameila tries to improve by giving herself a makeover and almost loses a friend in the process.
Reading Level:
710 Lexile.
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR MG 4.7 1.0 41279.

Reading Counts RC 3-5 4.5 4 Quiz: 20179 Guided reading level: NR.

Format :


Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Clarence Library XX(1028466.3) Juvenile Fiction Open Shelf
Grand Island Library X Juvenile Fiction Open Shelf
North Collins Library XX(1028466.13) Juvenile Fiction Open Shelf
Riverside Branch Library XX(1028466.14) Juvenile Fiction Open Shelf

On Order



Amelia's notebooks entertain readers with great stories about the ups and downs of growing up, told from the perspective of an inquisitive, insightful 10-year-old girl. What's more, her witty words and whimsical doodles encourage girls to express their creativity by drawing and writing about their own lives.

A new girl at school is attracting every-one's attention. Discover what happens when Amelia tries to reinvent herself to be just like her.

Author Notes

Marissa Moss began as an illustrator of children's books. She is the author and illustrator of the Amelia series. She has written and illustrated more than 20 children's books including Amelia's Notebook, which was named a 1997 American Booksellers Association Pick of the Lists book. Her other books include Regina's Big Mistake and Knick Knack Paddywack.

My Notebook (with Help from Amelia) also won the 2000 Parent Council Outstanding Award Informational and Oh Boy, Amelia! won the 2001 Parent's Guide to Children's Media Award and the 2002 Children's Choice Award.

(Bowker Author Biography)

Reviews 2

Booklist Review

Gr. 3^-5. The two newest additions to Moss' Amelia series, with its characteristic black-and-white notebook look, include a diary and a book of correspondence between Amelia and her friend Nadia. All-New finds Amelia under the influence of a new girl in class. British, beautiful, and instantly popular, Charisse inspires Amelia to remake herself into a new, improved model, but by book's end, Amelia decides to be her old self again. Luv, Amelia is a more original book, but the inclusion of four pull-out letters within envelopes stuck to the pages (remember Ahlberg's Jolly Postman books?) may give librarians pause. If the letters disappear, readers will feel they're missing something, though the story doesn't really depend on them. Amelia's friend Nadia writes about looking after her ailing father while her mother works, and Amelia starts to wonder about her own father, who evidently left shortly after she was born. The correspondence makes engaging reading. As usual, Moss' Amelia-style drawings brightly illustrate the child's first-person notebooks. Sure to be requested by Amelia's fans. --Carolyn Phelan

School Library Journal Review

Gr 3-5-Amelia is back, pen and markers in hand, with two more journal installments. In The All-New Amelia, she struggles with her identity when a new student enters her class. Amelia loves everything about Charisse-her British accent, polished nails, and glossy lips. In an attempt to get the new girl's attention, Amelia changes her image. However, her efforts only alienate her from her true self-and from her true friends. In the end, she realizes that it's best to be herself. In Luv, Amelia Luv, Nadia, the two girls continue their friendship through a series of postcards and letters, some of which readers can remove from their envelopes. The friends are looking forward to going trick-or-treating in their respective states. However, Nadia is forced to cancel her plans when her father is injured in a car accident. In their letters, Amelia begins to wonder about her own father whom she has never met. Nadia encourages her to try to contact him. Moss's writing is sharp, witty, and humorous. The last page suggests that another notebook is on the way.-Lisa Gangemi Krapp, Rockville Centre Public Library, NY (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

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