Cover image for Mary Geddy's day : a colonial girl in Williamsburg
Title:
Mary Geddy's day : a colonial girl in Williamsburg
Author:
Waters, Kate.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : Scholastic Press, 1999.
Physical Description:
40 pages ; 27 cm
Language:
English
Reading Level:
AD 570 Lexile.
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR LG 3.7 0.5 32526.

Reading Counts RC 3-5 3.6 2 Quiz: 17390.
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780590929257
Format :
Book

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Library
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Material Type
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Central Library F234.W7 W38 1999 Juvenile Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Newstead Library F234.W7 W38 1999 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Boston Free Library F234.W7 W38 1999 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Concord Library F234.W7 W38 1999 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Orchard Park Library F234.W7 W38 1999 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Williamsville Library F234.W7 W38 1999 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Summary

Summary

It is May 15, 1776. Today, the colony of Virginia will cast their votes for independence from Britain. Mary Geddy anxiously awaits the results, because freedom will mean her best friend will move back to England, and her father will go to war.


Reviews 2

Booklist Review

Gr. 3^-5. From the author and photographer of Sarah Morton's Day (1989), Samuel Eaton's Day (1993), and Tapenum's Day (1996), this book spotlights a day in the life of a girl in Williamsburg. Although the day in question is May 15, 1776, when the Fifth Virginia Convention voted for independence from Great Britain, political events are peripheral to the story. The focus stays firmly on Mary, her family, and her friends. Colorful photographs show Mary waking, dressing, eating with her family, working on her sampler, learning to bake, visiting with a friend, comforting her sister, and joining a celebration after the vote. Some of the photos have a posed look, but the clarity of the pictures and the beauty of the scenes greatly enhance the book's appeal. Written in first person from Mary's point of view, the text tells a story while teaching a good deal about colonial living. The appended pages of notes include comments on aspects of social and political life in the colony, information about the Geddy family, and a period recipe for apple pie. An attractive introduction to life in colonial Williamsburg. Glossary appended. --Carolyn Phelan


School Library Journal Review

Gr 2-4 Waters sets her fictional story on May 15, 1776, when the Virginia colonists in Williamsburg will cast their vote either for or against independence from Great Britain. During the day, 10-year-old Mary Geddy concentrates on her chores, knowing that if the outcome of the vote is for independence her father will go to war as a patriot while her friend Anne's family, loyal to the king, will be moving back to England. Clear, crisp, colorful photographs of characters in traditional clothing taken in Williamsburg lend authenticity to the story. The author provides readers with information on Colonial life complete with colloquialisms ("William is not worth a button") as well as a story they can relate to the possibility of a best friend moving away. Readers who enjoyed Waters's Sarah Morton's Day (1989) and Samuel Eaton's Day (1993, both Scholastic) will want to read this one as well. Blair Christolon, Prince William Public Library System, Manassas, VA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


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