Cover image for The journal of Ben Uchida, citizen #13559, Mirror Lake internment camp
Title:
The journal of Ben Uchida, citizen #13559, Mirror Lake internment camp
Author:
Denenberg, Barry.
Personal Author:
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
New York : Scholastic Inc., 1999.
Physical Description:
156 pages : illustrations, map ; 20 cm.
Summary:
Twelve-year-old Ben Uchida keeps a journal of his experiences as a prisoner in a Japanese internment camp in Mirror Lake, California, during World War II.
Language:
English
Reading Level:
850 Lexile.
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR MG 5.2 4.0 32209.

Reading Counts RC 3-5 5.6 6 Quiz: 17143 Guided reading level: S.
ISBN:
9780590485319
Format :
Book

Available:*

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X Juvenile Fiction Series
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X Juvenile Fiction Series
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X Juvenile Fiction Series
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X Juvenile Fiction Series
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On Order

Summary

Summary

For almost 11 months in the internment camp, 12-year-old Ben Uchida keeps a journal and he writes, "It never seemed to matter before, but now my face was the face of the enemy".


Reviews 1

Booklist Review

Gr. 5^-8. This book in the Dear America series explores the forced internment of Japanese Americans during World War II. Beginning with the attack on Pearl Harbor, the fictional diary of Ben Uchida captures the hysteria that spread through the West Coast as Japanese Americans suddenly found themselves the focus of anger and suspicion. Soon Ben and his family are stripped of their possessions and separated. Ben's father is sent to a camp in Montana. Ben and his mother and sister are sent to a camp in desolate Mirror Lake, California. The journal describes the boredom and banalities of life at Mirror Lake, while references to barbed wire, armed guards, and watch towers serve as grim reminders that Ben is in an American concentration camp. Yet, this story is not polemical. Ben isn't a poster child for past wrongs. Instead, he comes across as a real kid, coping with anger, resentment, confusion, and fear. Historical notes put the World War II internment in the context of a long history of prejudice against Japanese Americans. --Todd Morning