Cover image for Life's little fable
Title:
Life's little fable
Author:
Cornwell, Patricia Daniels.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : Putnam's, [1999]

©1999
Physical Description:
1 volume (unpaged) : color illustrations ; 23 x 28 cm
Summary:
In the land of the pond there is no gravity and Jarrod, who has never fallen or felt heavy or learned to swim, wants to go into the pond, not knowing the grave danger that lurks there.
Language:
English
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780399233166
Format :
Book

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Summary

Summary

Bestselling novelist Patricia Cornwell imagines an extraordinary and beautiful land with all the appeal of a Garden of Eden in her first book for children. In a compelling fable, she explores the temptations and pitfalls that accompany freedom and choice in all our lives.Jarrod lives far away in a land where children climb trees and soar without fear of falling, and sunlight keeps out dark shadows.As happy as Jarrod is living with his mother and his sister, he is also curious and daring. He wonders about the mysterious pond, the one place his mother wants him to stay away from. How deep is it? Why can't he go into the water? Why is his mother so afraid for him?One day he cannot resist going to the pond. And there he encounters the fierce, green-as-slime "god of the pond," who lives deep down in the abyss. He tantalizes Jarrod with whispered promises of giving him anything he wants if only he will come into the water. How Jarrod answers those whispers changes life not only for himself but for all the creatures who live in the pond.The books of award-winning novelist Patricia Cornwell have received critical acclaim and become national and international bestsellers. Cornwell is the recipient of the Edgar, Creasey, Anthony, and Macavity awards, as well as the French Prix du Roman d'Aventura and England's coveted Gold Dagger.This, Cornwell's first children's book, came about because of a visit to a second-grade classroom in Los Angeles. After reading their stories, Patricia Cornwell was asked by the class if she had written any stories for children. That started her thinking, and on the flight home, she opened up her laptop. Life's Little Fable is the happy outcome.


Author Notes

Patricia Cornwell was born in Miami, Florida on June 9, 1956. When she was nine years old, her mother tried to give her and her two brothers to evangelist Billy Graham and his wife to care for. For a while the children lived with missionaries since their mother was unable to care for them.

After graduating from Davidson College in 1979, she worked for The Charlotte Observer eventually covering the police beat and winning an investigative reporting award from the North Carolina Press Association for a series of articles on prostitution and crime in downtown Charlotte. Her award-winning biography of Ruth Bell Graham, the wife of Billy Graham, A Time for Remembering, was published in 1983. From 1984 to 1990, she worked as a technical writer and a computer analyst at the Office of the Chief Medical Examiner in Richmond, Virginia. While working for the medical examiner, she began to write novels. Although the award-winning novel Postmortem was initially rejected by seven different publishers, once it was published in 1990 it became the only novel ever to win the Edgar, Creasey, Anthony, and Macavity awards as well as the French Prix du Roman d'Adventure, in one year.

She is the author of the Kay Scarpetta series, the Andy Brazil series, and the Winston Garano series. She has also written two cookbooks entitled Scarpetta's Winter Table and Food to Die For; a children's book entitled Life's Little Fable; and non-fiction works like Portrait of a Killer: Jack the Ripper - Case Closed.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 1

School Library Journal Review

Gr 2-4-An adult writer does not a children's author make, as proven once again by this confusing, lifeless story. Jarrod lives in an alternative place where there is no gravity, which Cornwell describes in the following manner: "But sunlight did not make dark places called shadows in the land of the pond, and children could climb trees all day long and never fall from branch or frond." The boy nearly falls prey to his inquisitive nature and the "god of the pond," an evil crocodile that tries to tempt him into the water. Wearing "shorts made of tiger hide," he fights off the beast, somehow making his world a safe place to live. Cornwell's awkwardly stated sentences, which often attempt to rhyme, deter a smooth flow, and Gibson's pedestrian illustrations, while delivering some nice wildlife images, are generally unimaginative. This little fable falls flat.-Barbara Elleman, Marquette University, Milwaukee, WI (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.