Cover image for Colonial America to 1763
Title:
Colonial America to 1763
Author:
Purvis, Thomas L., 1949-
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : Facts on File, 1999.
Physical Description:
xv, 381 pages : illustrations, maps ; 29 cm.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780816025275
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library E188 .P86 1999 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks-Oversize Non-Circ
Searching...
Clarence Library E188 .P86 1999 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
Searching...
Clearfield Library E188 .P86 1999 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
Searching...
Dudley Branch Library E188 .P86 1999 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
Searching...
East Aurora Library E188 .P86 1999 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
Searching...
Eggertsville-Snyder Library E188 .P86 1999 Adult Non-Fiction Reference material
Searching...
Grand Island Library E188 .P86 1999 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
Searching...
Kenmore Library E188 .P86 1999 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
Searching...
Lancaster Library E188 .P86 1999 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
Searching...
Audubon Library E188 .P86 1999 Adult Non-Fiction Reference material
Searching...

On Order

Summary

Summary

From the first European explorations of the Americas to the coming of age of American cities in the 18th century, this volume vividly portrays the realities of daily life for those who came to the New World in search of a better life and settled a vast continent.

The book provides unparalleled coverage of the economy, politics, culture, society, art, and other elements that defined colonial life. Brief sketches and extended essays on a wide range of topics are used as appropriate to place quantitative data into perspective.

Topics covered include: The harsh weather extremes that tested the endurance of the earliest European settlers The impact of the Europeans' arrival on Native American populations and cultures Colonization and regional settlement patterns, including the first permanent English settlement in America founded at Jamestown in 1607 The Mayflower Compact of 1607 and the establishment of a legal basis for a civil society The arrival of African Americans in Anglo-America Witchcraft in the 17th century, including the witchcraft craze in Salem Village Prominent and representative Americans of the period, such as Pocahontas, John Smith, Edward Teach (Blackbeard), and Benjamin Franklin Education and its value to Anglo-Americans, including the founding of Harvard in 1636 Publishing and literature, including the colonies' first imprint in Cambridge, Massachusetts in early 1639, the publication of "Poor Richard's Almanac," and Boston's recognition as the cradle of colonial journalism The coming of age of American cities Boston, New York, Philadelphia, Charles Town, and Newport by the 1750s. A chronology of colonial American history through 1763 documents significant developments as well as events related to social customs, law, and the economy, such as the first American woman denied the right to vote (Martha Brent of Maryland in 1647), and the earliest antismoking legislation passed by Massachusetts Bay in 1646 (which forbade smoking in town as a fire hazard). To enhance readers' appreciation of this period, the text includes more than 100 illustrations and maps.


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

The fourth entry in the Almanac of American Life series, aimed at a high-school audience, this volume is divided into 19 broad categories such as economy, population, religion, individual colonies, architecture, holidays, etc. The entries are a mix of narrative and data, with statistical tables and lists making up around 50 percent of the content. Many of the tables offer information that is quite esoteric: five charts on the economics of the deerskin trade; the price of indigo in shillings of local currency. Other titles in the series are Modern America, 1914^-1945; Revolutionary America, 1763^-1800 [RBB O 1 95]; and Victorian America, 1876^-1913.


School Library Journal Review

-This compendium is a veritable treasure trove of information, divided into 19 chapters that cover such topics as "Diet and Health," "Religion," "The Cities," "Science and Technology," "Crime and Violence," and "Popular Life and Recreation." There are general details of Colonial life as well as obscure and difficult-to-find facts that students need and teachers always want. Copious tables, maps, and charts cover everything from small-town population statistics to the heights of Colonial soldiers. Readers will find lists of the pre-1763 Indian treaties, perpetual calendars, the price of wheat, rice exports, lists of Governors and Chief Justices, distribution of craft workers, wage rates, occupations of New York taxpayers, and a chronology from 2,000,000 B.C.E to A.D. 1763. The text is also sprinkled with black-and-white reproductions of period art and photographs of the Colonial areas as they appear today. Young adults will enjoy leafing through all of the fascinating facts and curious bits of information, but the well-organized, complete, and accessible text will also provide an invaluable resource for research and term papers.-Becky Ferrall, Stonewall Jackson High School, Manassas, VA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Choice Review

The impressive quantity and quality of work found here incorporate a great breadth of useful information about Colonial America. It is part of the series "Almanacs of American Life," one of three edited by Purvis, a scholar of Colonial American history. On one level, it is a compendium of quantitative data on Colonial America, but beyond that it provides both sketches and longer essays summarizing current thinking about early American history and culture. It expands tremendously the statistical coverage on Colonial America in Historical Statistics of the United States: Colonial Times to 1970. Sources for all statistical tables are cited, and the detailed bibliography and index are genuinely useful additions to the work. A marvelous reference companion for serious students, highly recommended for academic libraries. C. V. Stanley; Washington & Lee University


Excerpts

Excerpts

From the first European explorations of the Americas to the coming of age of American cities in the 18th century, this volume vividly portrays the realities of daily life for those who came to the New World in search of a better life and settled a vast continent. The book provides unparalleled coverage of the economy, politics, culture, society, art, and other elements that defined colonial life. Brief sketches and extended essays on a wide range of topics are used as appropriate to place quantitative data into perspective. Topics covered include: The harsh weather extremes that tested the endurance of the earliest European settlers The impact of the Europeans' arrival on Native American populations and cultures Colonization and regional settlement patterns, including the first permanent English settlement in America founded at Jamestown in 1607 The Mayflower Compact of 1607 and the establishment of a legal basis for a civil society The arrival of African Americans in Anglo-America Witchcraft in the 17th century, including the witchcraft craze in Salem Village Prominent and representative Americans of the period, such as Pocahontas, John Smith, Edward Teach (Blackbeard), and Benjamin Franklin Education and its value to Anglo-Americans, including the founding of Harvard in 1636 Publishing and literature, including the colonies' first imprint in Cambridge, Massachusetts in early 1639, the publication of Poor Richard's Almanac, and Boston's recognition as the cradle of colonial journalism The coming of age of American cities--Boston, New York, Philadelphia, Charles Town, and Newport--by the 1750s. A chronology of colonial American history through 1763 documents significant developments as well as events related to social customs, law, and the economy, such as the first American woman denied the right to vote (Martha Brent of Maryland in 1647), and the earliest antismoking legislation passed by Massachusetts Bay in 1646 (which forbade smoking in town as a fire hazard). To enhance readers' appreciation of this period, the text includes more than 100 illustrations and maps. Excerpted from Colonial America to 1763 by Thomas L. Purvis All rights reserved by the original copyright owners. Excerpts are provided for display purposes only and may not be reproduced, reprinted or distributed without the written permission of the publisher.

Google Preview