Cover image for Religion and human rights : competing claims?
Title:
Religion and human rights : competing claims?
Author:
Gustafson, Carrie, 1966-
Publication Information:
Armonk, N.Y. : M.E. Sharpe, [1999]

©1999
Physical Description:
xii, 209 pages ; 24 cm.
Language:
English
Contents:
Introduction : ambiguities of the divine / Peter Juviler -- Human rights and public theology : the basic validation of human rights / Max L. Stackhouse -- Reply: Human rights : religious or enlightened? / Louis Henkin -- Human environmental rights and/or biotic rights / Larry Rasmussen -- Reply: Rights of creation to rites of revolution / Patricia A. Daly -- Religion and societal change : the struggle for human rights in Latin America / Margaret E. Crahan -- Reply: Religion and societal change : the struggle for human rights in Latin America / James F. Joyce -- Gandhi's philosophy of Satyagraha : cautionary notes for the International Penal Lobby / Carrie Gustafson -- Reply: Secular eschatologies and class interests of the Internationalized new class / Kenneth Anderson -- Speaking/seeking a common language : women, the Hindu right, and human rights in India / Arati Rao -- Reply: Reconceptualizing the relationships between religion, women, culture, and human rights / Julie Stone Peters -- Feminism, Jewish orthodoxy, and human rights : strange bedfellows? / Blu Greenberg -- Reply: Jewish orthodoxy, modernity, and women's rights / Alan R. Segal -- Islamic law and human rights : conundrums and equivocations / Ann Elizabeth Mayer.
Reading Level:
1550 Lexile.
ISBN:
9780765602619

9780765602626
Format :
Book

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Summary

Summary

Much has been written about the issue of religious freedom and church-state relations. The contributors to this book, however, take up another side of the question: what has been the impact of religion on human rights. Representatives from various religious traditions address a broad range of topics, from environmental rights to the basic validation of human rights, to the rights of women in India and Iran and within Orthodox Judaism, to the global imposition of criminal justice, to pressures for democratization within the Catholic Church in Latin America. The six major essays, along with their accompanying "replies" answer questions and raise issues in a provocative and compelling debate.


Author Notes

Kenneth Anderson is Associate Professor of Law at the Washington College of Law, American University
Margaret E. Crahan is Dorothy Epstein Professor of Latin American History at Hunter College, City University of New York
Patricia A. Daly, O.P. is Executive Director of the Tri-State Coalition for Responsible Investment, is a member of the Governing Board of the Interfaith Center on Corporate Responsibility
Blu Greenberg is writes and lectures on issues of contemporary Jewish interest. In 1997 and 1998 she chaired the historic International Conference on Feminism and Orthodoxy
Carrie Gustafson is Associate-in-Law and MIA/JSD candidate, Columbia Law School
Louis Henkin is University Professor Emeritus, Board Chair of the Center for the Study of Human Rights, and Special Service Professor at Columbia University
James F. Joyce, S.J. is Director of Social Ministries, New York Province, Society of Jesus
Peter Juviler is Professor of Political Science at Barnard College, is CoDirector of the Center for the Study of Human Rights, Columbia University
Ann Elizabeth Mayer is Associate Professor of Legal Studies at the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania
Julie Stone Peters is Associate Professor of English and Comparative Literature at Columbia University
Arati Rao is Associate Director of the Southern Asian Institute at Columbia University
Larry Rasmussen is Reinhold Niebuhr Professor of Social Ethics at Union Theological Seminary
Alan F. Segal is Professor of Religion at Barnard College
Donald W. Shriver Jr. is an ordained Presbyterian minister, a member of the Council on Foreign Relations, and past president of the Society of Christian Ethics
Max L. Stackhouse is Stephen Colwell Professor of Christian Ethics at Princeton Theological Seminary and Director of the Project on Public Theology at Princeton University


Table of Contents

1 Introduction: Ambiguities of the DivinePeter Juviler
2 Human Rights and Public Theology: The Basic Validation of Human RightsMax L. Stackhouse
Reply: Human Rights: Religious or Enlightened?Louis Henkin
3 Human Environmental Rights and/or Biotic RightsLarry Rasmussen
Reply: Rights of Creation to Rites of RevolutionPatricia Daly
4 Religion and Societal Change: The Struggle for Human Rights in Latin AmericaMargaret Crahan
Reply: Religion and Societal Change: The Struggle for Human Rights in Latin AmericaJames F. Joyce
5 Gandhi's Philosophy of Satyagraha: Cautionary Notes for the International Penal LobbyCarrie Gustafson
Reply: Secular Eschatologies and Class Interests of the Internationalized New ClassKenneth Anderson
6 Seeking/Speaking a Common Language: Women, the Hindu Right, and Human Rights in IndiaArati Rao
Reply: Reconceptualizing the Relationships Between Religion, Women, Culture, and Human RightsJulie Stone Peters
7 Feminism, Orthodoxy, and Human Rights: Strange Bedfellows?Blu Greenberg
Reply: Orthodoxy, Modernity, and Women's RightsAlan Segal
8 Islamic Law and Human Rights: Conundrums and EquivocationsAnn Elizabeth Mayer