Cover image for The evolution of international human rights : visions seen
Title:
The evolution of international human rights : visions seen
Author:
Lauren, Paul Gordon.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Philadelphia : University of Pennsylvania Press, [1998]

©1998
Physical Description:
xiii, 385 pages : illustrations ; 26 cm.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780812232745

9780812215212
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library JC571 .L285 1998 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Summary

Summary

This book focuses on international human rights. It explores the transformation of a world patterned by centuries of traditional structures of authority, gender abuse, racial prejudice, class divisions and slavery, colonial empires, and claims of national sovereignty into a global community.


Summary

It is difficult to imagine a finer gift on the fiftieth anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights than this study of the Declaration's complex and far-reaching impact.-American Historical Review


Reviews 2

Choice Review

The 50th anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) has loosed a spate of books on the academic world. Lauren's volume will count among the very best, with its thorough detail, wide range, and fascinating insights. With more than 1,050 footnotes and ample use of primary and archival sources, this volume is a model of scholarship. It shows how visionaries and diplomats, NGOs and governments, moved from the almost totally unquestioned pre-WWII doctrine of domestic sovereignty to the current reality of global awareness of and obligations to internal human rights practices. The 1948 Universal Declaration of Human Rights, Lauren aptly comments, constitutes a "global vision." Eighty percent of the book is devoted to the UDHR's background, the remainder to "transforming visions into reality," about which far more has been published, (e.g., Richard Claude and Burns Westin, Human Rights in the World Community, 1992; Jack Donnelly, Universal Human Rights in Theory and Practice, 1989; The Universal Declaration of Human Rights: A Commentary, ed. By Asbjrrn Eide et al., CH, Dec '93; and Henry Steiner et al., International Human Rights in Context, 1996.) The volume under review belongs in the library of every college, citizen activist, or scholar interested in how one of humanity's transforming documents came into being. C. E. Welch SUNY at Buffalo


Choice Review

The 50th anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) has loosed a spate of books on the academic world. Lauren's volume will count among the very best, with its thorough detail, wide range, and fascinating insights. With more than 1,050 footnotes and ample use of primary and archival sources, this volume is a model of scholarship. It shows how visionaries and diplomats, NGOs and governments, moved from the almost totally unquestioned pre-WWII doctrine of domestic sovereignty to the current reality of global awareness of and obligations to internal human rights practices. The 1948 Universal Declaration of Human Rights, Lauren aptly comments, constitutes a "global vision." Eighty percent of the book is devoted to the UDHR's background, the remainder to "transforming visions into reality," about which far more has been published, (e.g., Richard Claude and Burns Westin, Human Rights in the World Community, 1992; Jack Donnelly, Universal Human Rights in Theory and Practice, 1989; The Universal Declaration of Human Rights: A Commentary, ed. By Asbjrrn Eide et al., CH, Dec '93; and Henry Steiner et al., International Human Rights in Context, 1996.) The volume under review belongs in the library of every college, citizen activist, or scholar interested in how one of humanity's transforming documents came into being. C. E. Welch SUNY at Buffalo


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