Cover image for My brother, Ant
Title:
My brother, Ant
Author:
Byars, Betsy Cromer.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Prince Frederick, MD : Recorded Books, [1998]

℗1998
Physical Description:
1 audiocassette (15 min.) : analog + 1 book (31 pages : color illustrations ; 23 cm.).
Summary:
In four separate stories, Ant's older brother gets rid of the monster under Ant's bed, forgives Ant for drawing on his homework, tries to read a story, and helps Ant write a letter to Santa.
General Note:
Unabridged.

Recorded Books: 95324 (on set container: 40638)
Language:
English
Reading Level:
Ages 6 and up.

130 Lexile.
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR LG 1.7 0.5 16398.

Reading Counts RC K-2 2.2 2 Quiz: 08064 Guided reading level: J.
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780788719318

9780788719035

9780140383454
Format :
Sound Cassette

Sound Recording

Available:*

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CASSETTE KIT 1037 BOOK Juvenile Fiction Readers
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Summary

Summary

Level 3. This story presents a warm, funny relationship between a boy and his sweet, sometimes annoying, younger brother Ant (short for Anthony).


Summary

Laugh out loud when Anthony hears monsters under his bed, decorates his big brother's homework & writes to Santa in July. Traces the unique relationship between young brothers


Summary

Meet Ant, the little brother who's big on laughs. In four upbeat stories, Ant and his big brother confront the monster under the bed, recreate the story of the three little pigs, and write a letter to Santa--in July! Sometimes funny, always endearing, Ant is invariably entertaining.' "A great storyteller and a great illustrator are at their very best in this tender, funny easy-to-read."-- Booklist , starred review


Author Notes

Betsy Cromer Byars was born in1928. She graduated from Queens College in Charlotte, North Carolina. While she was in graduate school, she began writing articles for The Saturday Evening Post and Look.

Byars writes novels for young people. She is an expert at tapping in to the pain of adolescence, using bits of her own experience to flavor her characters. She is author of more than 23 books and has won numerous awards. Her book about a 14-year-old girl and her mentally retarded brother, The Summer of the Swans (1970), won the Newberry Award as the most distinguished contribution to children's literature that year. Other books include The 18th Emergency (1973), The TV Kid (1976), and After the Goat Man (1995).

(Bowker Author Biography)


Betsy Cromer Byars was born in1928. She graduated from Queens College in Charlotte, North Carolina. While she was in graduate school, she began writing articles for The Saturday Evening Post and Look.

Byars writes novels for young people. She is an expert at tapping in to the pain of adolescence, using bits of her own experience to flavor her characters. She is author of more than 23 books and has won numerous awards. Her book about a 14-year-old girl and her mentally retarded brother, The Summer of the Swans (1970), won the Newberry Award as the most distinguished contribution to children's literature that year. Other books include The 18th Emergency (1973), The TV Kid (1976), and After the Goat Man (1995).

(Bowker Author Biography)


Betsy Cromer Byars was born in1928. She graduated from Queens College in Charlotte, North Carolina. While she was in graduate school, she began writing articles for The Saturday Evening Post and Look.

Byars writes novels for young people. She is an expert at tapping in to the pain of adolescence, using bits of her own experience to flavor her characters. She is author of more than 23 books and has won numerous awards. Her book about a 14-year-old girl and her mentally retarded brother, The Summer of the Swans (1970), won the Newberry Award as the most distinguished contribution to children's literature that year. Other books include The 18th Emergency (1973), The TV Kid (1976), and After the Goat Man (1995).

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 9

Booklist Review

Gr. 1^-3. Forget Dick and Jane. Books for beginning readers have been an honored genre in children's literature for more than 30 years, from Else Minarik and Maurice Sendak's Little Bear (1957) as well as their 1962 Caldecott Honor book, Little Bear's Visit and Arnold Lobel's classic Frog and Toad books, to Cynthia Rylant's Henry and Mudge series and the exceptional science books by writers such as Paul Showers and Joanna Cole. A great storyteller and a great illustrator are at their very best in this tender, funny Easy-to-Read chapter book in which a boy talks about his younger brother, Ant. The family situations are elemental, and there's not a trace of condescension. In one story, Anthony (Ant) is afraid of the monster under his bed; Dad's irritable, so the older brother has to take care of things, comfort Ant, and banish the beast. In the next story, the older boy is furious because someone has scribbled on his perfect spelling homework. Every chapter has a surprising twist that grows from the people and their relationships. When his brother reads to him, Ant doesn't want one word changed of "The Three Little Pigs," not one word, but then he can't bear to stay around to hear about the scary wolf. The pictures are achingly affectionate. As in his illustrations for Welch's Playing Right Field (1995), Simont shows the small child's sturdy innocence and vulnerability. Every part of Ant's body pays attention. The economy of line and language will grab new readers. They'll see that a good story can leave a lot unsaid, even while it shows you what you didn't quite know you felt. --Hazel Rochman


Publisher's Weekly Review

It may not earn Byars (Summer of the Swans) another Newbery Medal or Simont (A Tree Is Nice) another Caldecott, but this volume is tailor-made for kids just beginning to read on their own. For starters, they will immediately take to the admirably tolerant narrator, whose feisty younger brother, Ant (short for Anthony), would test any sibling's patience. In these snippets, the older boy chases a monster from under Ant's bed; copes with an indecipherable picture that someone (guess who?) has drawn on his homework paper; reads Ant a fairy tale; and plays scribe when Ant dictates a letter to Santa . . . in July. Told with brevity, in simply constructed sentences and controlled vocabulary, these four vignettes are full of homespun warmth and easy-going humor. Echoing the good-natured narrative, Simont's straightforward pictures do a commendable job of helping to relay the plots-a big plus in fiction for this audience. Ages 6-9. (Mar.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

K-Gr 3‘In this appealing easy reader, a boy chronicles how his sometimes-pesky younger brother, Ant, puts a twist on everyday events and keeps the family on its toes. The caring older sibling gets rid of the monster under Ant's bed, reads him a short version of "The Three Little Figs," records his summer thank-you letter to Santa, and manages to take into stride the preschooler's addition to his spelling homework. The affectionate relationship between the boys underscores all the stories. Simont's lively, realistic watercolors enhance the understated humor. Beginning readers will enjoy this effort and look forward to more low-key adventures featuring the irrepressible Ant.‘Gale W. Sherman, Pocatello Public Library, ID (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Booklist Review

Gr. 1^-3. Forget Dick and Jane. Books for beginning readers have been an honored genre in children's literature for more than 30 years, from Else Minarik and Maurice Sendak's Little Bear (1957) as well as their 1962 Caldecott Honor book, Little Bear's Visit and Arnold Lobel's classic Frog and Toad books, to Cynthia Rylant's Henry and Mudge series and the exceptional science books by writers such as Paul Showers and Joanna Cole. A great storyteller and a great illustrator are at their very best in this tender, funny Easy-to-Read chapter book in which a boy talks about his younger brother, Ant. The family situations are elemental, and there's not a trace of condescension. In one story, Anthony (Ant) is afraid of the monster under his bed; Dad's irritable, so the older brother has to take care of things, comfort Ant, and banish the beast. In the next story, the older boy is furious because someone has scribbled on his perfect spelling homework. Every chapter has a surprising twist that grows from the people and their relationships. When his brother reads to him, Ant doesn't want one word changed of "The Three Little Pigs," not one word, but then he can't bear to stay around to hear about the scary wolf. The pictures are achingly affectionate. As in his illustrations for Welch's Playing Right Field (1995), Simont shows the small child's sturdy innocence and vulnerability. Every part of Ant's body pays attention. The economy of line and language will grab new readers. They'll see that a good story can leave a lot unsaid, even while it shows you what you didn't quite know you felt. --Hazel Rochman


Publisher's Weekly Review

It may not earn Byars (Summer of the Swans) another Newbery Medal or Simont (A Tree Is Nice) another Caldecott, but this volume is tailor-made for kids just beginning to read on their own. For starters, they will immediately take to the admirably tolerant narrator, whose feisty younger brother, Ant (short for Anthony), would test any sibling's patience. In these snippets, the older boy chases a monster from under Ant's bed; copes with an indecipherable picture that someone (guess who?) has drawn on his homework paper; reads Ant a fairy tale; and plays scribe when Ant dictates a letter to Santa . . . in July. Told with brevity, in simply constructed sentences and controlled vocabulary, these four vignettes are full of homespun warmth and easy-going humor. Echoing the good-natured narrative, Simont's straightforward pictures do a commendable job of helping to relay the plots-a big plus in fiction for this audience. Ages 6-9. (Mar.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

K-Gr 3‘In this appealing easy reader, a boy chronicles how his sometimes-pesky younger brother, Ant, puts a twist on everyday events and keeps the family on its toes. The caring older sibling gets rid of the monster under Ant's bed, reads him a short version of "The Three Little Figs," records his summer thank-you letter to Santa, and manages to take into stride the preschooler's addition to his spelling homework. The affectionate relationship between the boys underscores all the stories. Simont's lively, realistic watercolors enhance the understated humor. Beginning readers will enjoy this effort and look forward to more low-key adventures featuring the irrepressible Ant.‘Gale W. Sherman, Pocatello Public Library, ID (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Booklist Review

Gr. 1^-3. Forget Dick and Jane. Books for beginning readers have been an honored genre in children's literature for more than 30 years, from Else Minarik and Maurice Sendak's Little Bear (1957) as well as their 1962 Caldecott Honor book, Little Bear's Visit and Arnold Lobel's classic Frog and Toad books, to Cynthia Rylant's Henry and Mudge series and the exceptional science books by writers such as Paul Showers and Joanna Cole. A great storyteller and a great illustrator are at their very best in this tender, funny Easy-to-Read chapter book in which a boy talks about his younger brother, Ant. The family situations are elemental, and there's not a trace of condescension. In one story, Anthony (Ant) is afraid of the monster under his bed; Dad's irritable, so the older brother has to take care of things, comfort Ant, and banish the beast. In the next story, the older boy is furious because someone has scribbled on his perfect spelling homework. Every chapter has a surprising twist that grows from the people and their relationships. When his brother reads to him, Ant doesn't want one word changed of "The Three Little Pigs," not one word, but then he can't bear to stay around to hear about the scary wolf. The pictures are achingly affectionate. As in his illustrations for Welch's Playing Right Field (1995), Simont shows the small child's sturdy innocence and vulnerability. Every part of Ant's body pays attention. The economy of line and language will grab new readers. They'll see that a good story can leave a lot unsaid, even while it shows you what you didn't quite know you felt. --Hazel Rochman


Publisher's Weekly Review

It may not earn Byars (Summer of the Swans) another Newbery Medal or Simont (A Tree Is Nice) another Caldecott, but this volume is tailor-made for kids just beginning to read on their own. For starters, they will immediately take to the admirably tolerant narrator, whose feisty younger brother, Ant (short for Anthony), would test any sibling's patience. In these snippets, the older boy chases a monster from under Ant's bed; copes with an indecipherable picture that someone (guess who?) has drawn on his homework paper; reads Ant a fairy tale; and plays scribe when Ant dictates a letter to Santa . . . in July. Told with brevity, in simply constructed sentences and controlled vocabulary, these four vignettes are full of homespun warmth and easy-going humor. Echoing the good-natured narrative, Simont's straightforward pictures do a commendable job of helping to relay the plots-a big plus in fiction for this audience. Ages 6-9. (Mar.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

K-Gr 3‘In this appealing easy reader, a boy chronicles how his sometimes-pesky younger brother, Ant, puts a twist on everyday events and keeps the family on its toes. The caring older sibling gets rid of the monster under Ant's bed, reads him a short version of "The Three Little Figs," records his summer thank-you letter to Santa, and manages to take into stride the preschooler's addition to his spelling homework. The affectionate relationship between the boys underscores all the stories. Simont's lively, realistic watercolors enhance the understated humor. Beginning readers will enjoy this effort and look forward to more low-key adventures featuring the irrepressible Ant.‘Gale W. Sherman, Pocatello Public Library, ID (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.