Cover image for Introduction to addictive behaviors
Title:
Introduction to addictive behaviors
Author:
Thombs, Dennis L.
Personal Author:
Edition:
Second edition.
Publication Information:
New York : Guilford Press, [1999]

©1999
Physical Description:
xiv, 304 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9781572304116
Format :
Book

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Summary

Summary

This popular text reviews and critiques major contemporary perspectives on alcoholism and drug dependence, including the disease models, psychoanalytic formulations, and theories based on conditioning, social learning, family systems, and sociology. Throughout, applications to the helping process are emphasized and learning is facilitated by case examples and review questions. With all chapters extensively revised to reflect the expanding knowledge base in addictive behavior, the second edition incorporates recent advances in such areas as behavioral genetics, neuroscience, dual diagnosis, contingency management, cognitive expectancy, children of alcoholics, drug subcultures, and motivation enhancement.


Author Notes

Dennis L. Thombs, PhD, is Associate Professor in the Department of Adult, Counseling, Health and Vocational Education at Kent State University. Dr. Thombs has worked in the mental health field, including substance abuse treatment and prevention, for more than 15 years. The author of numerous articles in the area of health behavior, his chief research focus is adolescent and young adult alcohol abuse.


Table of Contents

1 The Multiple Conceptions of Addictive Behavior and Professional Practice Today
2 The Disease Models
3 Public Health and Prevention Approaches
4 Toward an Understanding of Comorbidity
5 Psychoanalytic Formulations
6 Conditioning Models and Approaches to Contingency Management
7 Cognitive Models
8 The Family System
9 Social and Cultural Foundations
10 Conditions That Facilitate and Inhibit Change in Addictive Behavior