Cover image for Franny and Zooey.
Title:
Franny and Zooey.
Author:
Salinger, J. D. (Jerome David), 1919-2010.
Publication Information:
Boston : Little, Brown 1961.
Physical Description:
201 pages ; 21 cm
Language:
English
Reading Level:
990 Lexile.
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR UG 6.3 8.0 66222.

Reading Counts RC High School 8.1 13 Quiz: 20720 Guided reading level: NR.
ISBN:
9780316769549
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Concord Library FICTION Adult Mass Market Paperback Open Shelf
Searching...
Grand Island Library FICTION Adult Fiction Open Shelf
Searching...
Hamburg Library X Adult Fiction Open Shelf
Searching...
Kenmore Library FICTION Adult Fiction Open Shelf
Searching...
Audubon Library FICTION Adult Fiction Open Shelf
Searching...

On Order

Summary

Summary

The author writes: FRANNY came out in The New Yorker in 1955, and was swiftly followed, in 1957 by ZOOEY. Both stories are early, critical entries in a narrative series I'm doing about a family of settlers in twentieth-century New York, the Glasses. It is a long-term project, patently an ambiguous one, and there is a real-enough danger, I suppose that sooner or later I'll bog down, perhaps disappear entirely, in my own methods, locutions, and mannerisms. On the whole, though, I'm very hopeful. I love working on these Glass stories, I've been waiting for them most of my life, and I think I have fairly decent, monomaniacal plans to finish them with due care and all-available skill.


Author Notes

J. D. Salinger was born in New York City on January 1, 1919. He attended Manhattan public schools, Valley Forge Military Academy in Pennsylvania, and three colleges, but received no degrees. He was from an upper class Jewish family and they lived on the upper west side of Manhattan on Park Avenue. Salinger joined the U. S. Army in 1942 and fought in the D-Day invasion at Normandy as well as the Battle of the Bulge, but suffered a nervous breakdown due to all he had seen and experienced in the war and checked himself into an Army hospital in Germany in 1945.

In December 1945, his short story I'm Crazy was published in Collier's. In 1947, his short story A Perfect Day for Bananafish was published in The New Yorker. Throughout his lifetime, he wrote more than 30 short stories and a handful of novellas, which were published in magazines and later collected in works such as Nine Stories, Franny and Zooey, and Raise High the Roof Beam, Carpenters and Seymour: An Introduction. The Catcher in the Rye, published in 1951, was his only novel. His last published story, Hapworth 16, 1924, appeared in 1965. He spent the remainder of his years in seclusion and silence in a home in Cornish, New Hampshire. He died of natural causes on January 27, 2010 at the age of 91.

Salinger always wanted to write the great American novel; when he succeeded in this with Catcher in the Rye, he was unprepared for the onslaught on privacy issues that this popularity brought on. He never wanted to be in the spotlight and retreated from all contacts he had in New York City.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Google Preview