Cover image for Goya
Title:
Goya
Author:
Foa, Emma.
Publication Information:
New York : DK Publishing, 1999.

©1998
Physical Description:
143 pages : illustrations (chiefly color) ; 21 cm.
General Note:
Includes indexes.
Language:
English
Personal Subject:
ISBN:
9780789441409
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library ND813.G7 G69 1998 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area
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Newstead Library ND813.G7 G69 1998 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Clarence Library ND813.G7 G69 1998 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Clearfield Library ND813.G7 G69 1998 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Kenmore Library ND813.G7 G69 1998 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Lancaster Library ND813.G7 G69 1998 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Marilla Free Library ND813.G7 G69 1998 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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North Collins Library ND813.G7 G69 1998 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Orchard Park Library ND813.G7 G69 1998 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Anna M. Reinstein Library ND813.G7 G69 1998 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Riverside Branch Library ND813.G7 G69 1998 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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On Order

Summary

Summary

Each volume is a visual resource with over 300 full-color illustrations, telling the story of a single artist with a look at the artist's life, the context in which he worked, and an analysis of his masterpieces.


Author Notes

Francisco Jose de Goya y Lucientes was the great Spanish painter and graphic artist whose fame rests not only on his superb painterly abilities, but also on the darkness and drama of the subject matter he recorded. Rembrandt's powerful influence is easily observed. Born in Saragossa, he settled in Madrid in 1774. His early paintings are lively, cheerful, and almost rococo in feeling (e.g., his tapestry cartoons in the Prado). In 1789 Goya was appointed official court painter---a position once held by Diego Velazquez, whom he admired and emulated.

In 1794 Goya became deaf, and his mood changed profoundly. He began to draw and etch. The Caprichos (1796--98), aquatinted etchings which date from that period, present satirical, grotesque, and nightmarish scenes. His famous, unsparingly realistic, Family of King Charles IV (critics still wonder how he got away with it) was painted in 1800. When Spain was taken over by Napoleon in 1808, a terrible civil war ensued. Goya, torn between his Francophile liberalism and his Spanish patriotism, more than all else hated the cruelties of war. The 65 etchings that comprise Los Desastres de la Guerra are among the most moving antiwar documents in all art. Fourteen large mysterious murals, the so-called Black Paintings, were painted toward the end of Goya's life. He spent his last years in Bordeaux, in voluntary exile from the Spanish Bourbon regime.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 1

Library Journal Review

These three books are part of a series of brief monographs on big-name artists that also includes titles on Rembrandt, Monet, Bosch, da Vinci, Caravaggio, Gauguin, van Gogh, Titian, and C‚zanne. The popularity of the artists, the glitzy format, and the low price will probably guarantee sales. Reading these three installments, however, was more bewildering than enlightening. The publisher states that they are a perfect gift or study companion for art history students and art lovers alike. Yet art history students expect and deserve bibliographies and citations (neither of which are present), and art lovers will probably not appreciate the number of illustrations printed right into the book gutters. The text portions are well written, but editorial negligence in other areas is distracting: inconsistencies, typographical errors, and incorrect headings appear throughout, and illustrations are included in sections where they do not seem to belong. Even the covers have misleading juxtapositions. The Matisse volume features his portrait prominently under his name, but under Goya's name there appears a servant from one of his paintings. And whoever is pictured under Drer's name is a mystery, since he does not look like Drer, but no identification appears anywhere. Some mistakes are glaring; for example, a section headed "Matisse and etching" discusses his lithographs instead. Conversely, Drer's famous woodcut of "The Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse" is noted as one of a series of lithographsÄa process not even invented yet. The layout of the books is overly complex, with snippets of information under small illustrations scattered about in irregularly alternating color-coded sections. Although the colored sidebars suggest a distinction between "Life and Works," "Background," and "Masterpieces," there is often overlap, and some of the illustrations do not fall into whatever date span distractingly heads each page. Every facing two-page spread is concerned with a particular theme. Although these themes are relevant and interesting, when over 50 of them are presented this way in each book, the end result feels superficial rather than thorough. On top of all this, the film layer over the paperback covers peels away from the edges as one reads the books. Not recommended.ÄAnn Marie Lane, Univ. of Wyoming, Laramie (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


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