Cover image for End of millennium
Title:
End of millennium
Author:
Castells, Manuel, 1942-
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Malden, MA : Blackwell Publishers, 1998.
Physical Description:
xiv, 418 pages : illustrations, map ; 24 cm.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9781557868718

9781557868725
Format :
Book

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HN17.5 .C354 1998 V.3 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Summary

Summary

The final volume in Manuel Castells' trilogy is devoted to processes of global social change induced by interaction between networks and identity.


Summary

The final volume in Manuel Castells' trilogy is devoted to processes of global social change induced by interaction between networks and identity.


Author Notes

Manuel Castells is Professor of Sociology and of Planning at the University of California, Berkeley, a member of the European Academy, and a member of the European Commission's High Level Expert Group on the Information Society.


Manuel Castells is Professor of Sociology and of Planning at the University of California, Berkeley, a member of the European Academy, and a member of the European Commission's High Level Expert Group on the Information Society.


Reviews 1

Choice Review

In this third volume of his "The Information Age: Economy, Society and Culture" triology, Castells (Univ. of California, Berkeley) fills out his account of the transformation of the macropolitical and macrosocial contexts implied by the developments of the last 30 years, which are described and analyzed in his previous two volumes (v.1, The Rise of the Network Society, 2nd ed., 2000, 1st ed., CH, Feb'97; and v.2, The Power of Identity, 1997). Castells opens with an account of the collapse of the Soviet Union, a symbol of the previous order. He continues with accounts of the rise of the "fourth world," effectively excluded by the changes of the last three decades (using as examples sub-Saharan Africa and the ghettos of urban America); the new global criminal economy; the rise of the Asian-Pacific tigers; the transformation of Chinese communism; and the unification of Europe. The breadth of the reading and scholarship is impressive and, although inevitably inhabitants of particular subdisciplines will have their quibbles, the analysis is provocative, if not always as gloomily convincing as the author hopes. Strongly recommended for general readers and upper-division undergraduate through faculty audiences. D. E. Moggridge; University of Toronto