Cover image for Sammy Sosa--he's the man
Title:
Sammy Sosa--he's the man
Author:
Driscoll, Laura.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : Grosset & Dunlap, 1999.
Physical Description:
45 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
Summary:
Presents the life and baseball career of Sammy Sosa, who, along with Mark McGwire, in 1998 broke the long-standing record of most home runs hit in a season.
Language:
English
Reading Level:
510 Lexile.
Program Information:
Reading Counts RC 3-5 3.9 2 Quiz: 19542 Guided reading level: M.
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780448420691

9780448420677
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Concord Library GV865.S59 S68 1999 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Hamburg Library GV865.S59 S68 1999 Juvenile Non-Fiction Biography
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Williamsville Library GV865.S59 S68 1999 Juvenile Non-Fiction Biography
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Summary

Summary

An immense literature about the Civil War has nonetheless paid surprisingly little attention to the common soldier, North and South. Historians have shown even less concern for the long-term impact of this military service on American society. Larry M. Logue's To Appomattox and Beyond makes a major contribution in addressing this need. In a compact synthesis that draws upon important new materials from his own research, Logue provides the fullest account available of the Civil War soldier in war and peace--who fought, what happened to them in battle, how the public regarded them, how the war changed the rest of their lives, in what ways they were like and different from their counterparts across the Mason-Dixon line. To Appomattox and Beyond offers surprising conclusions about the psychological impact of warfare on its participants; about the North's generous pension system for veterans; and about the role that veterans played in politics and social issues, notably the Confederate racist reaction of the late nineteenth century. In a final irony, Logue points out, by the twentieth century men who had once been enemies now had more in common with each other than with the new world around them.


Summary

An immense literature about the Civil War has nonetheless paid surprisingly little attention to the common soldier, North and South. Historians have shown even less concern for the long-term impact of this military service on American society. Larry M. Logue's To Appomattox and Beyond makes a major contribution in addressing this need. In a compact synthesis that draws upon important new materials from his own research, Logue provides the fullest account available of the Civil War soldier in war and peace--who fought, what happened to them in battle, how the public regarded them, how the war changed the rest of their lives, in what ways they were like and different from their counterparts across the Mason-Dixon line. To Appomattox and Beyond offers surprising conclusions about the psychological impact of warfare on its participants; about the North's generous pension system for veterans; and about the role that veterans played in politics and social issues, notably the Confederate racist reaction of the late nineteenth century. In a final irony, Logue points out, by the twentieth century men who had once been enemies now had more in common with each other than with the new world around them.


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