Cover image for Future jazz
Future jazz
Mandel, Howard.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 1999.
Physical Description:
xiv, 235 pages ; 25 cm
General Note:
Includes index.
Reading Level:
1210 Lexile.
Format :


Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Central Library ML3506 .M33 1999 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area

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Jazz has always been an experimental art form, pushing the boundaries of the mainstream, searching for the new. As Howard Mandel reveals in Future Jazz, jazz today is still reaching out in exciting new directions. In a series of vividly drawn portraits and intimate, in-depth interviews with musicians, composers, experimenters, and club owners, Mandel captures the vitality and the passion of the modern jazz scene, from the 1970s to the present. The most successful jazz players of recent years have been theso-called Young Lions, and Mandel includes three extensive interviews with the Lion King himself, Wynton Marsalis, who shares his philosophy of jazz and his pointed opinions on the contemporary scene. But most of the book focuses on the more experimental and avant garde trends. The book traces thedevelopment of some of the dominant new jazz groups--talking to Lester Bowie of the Art Ensemble of Chicago and to members of the World Saxophone Quartet--and examines the work of a range of major jazz figures such as David Murray, Henry Threadgill, Joe Lovano, Geri Allen, and singer CassandraWilson. And in a great departure from other jazz books, Mandel examines the powerful influence of rock on jazz. He chats with guitarist John McLaughlin, whose groundbreaking collaboration with Miles Davis set off the fusion revolution, and probes the inventive ideas of other jazz musicians withroots in gospel, blues, and soul, such as George Benson and James "Blood" Ulmer. Ranging from the Knitting Factory to Lincoln Center, Future Jazz is an indispensable guide to today's scene and a valuable roadmap to the music of tomorrow.

Author Notes

Howard Mandel has written about jazz for twenty-five years, publishing in Billboard, The Village Voice, Jazziz, The New York Times Book Review, and Down Beat. He is a former editor of Down Beat, Ear Magazine, and RhythmMusic. His commentaries are heard on National Public Radio's MorningEdition. He is president of the Jazz Journalists Association, edits its web site (, and teaches "The Arts: Jazz" at NYU. He lives in New York City.

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