Cover image for Tito Puente and the making of Latin music
Title:
Tito Puente and the making of Latin music
Author:
Loza, Steven Joseph.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Urbana : University of Illinois Press, [1999]

©1999
Physical Description:
xvi, 260 pages, 28 unnumbered pages of plates : illustrations ; 26 cm.
Language:
English
Contents:
A historical sketch -- A conversation with the king -- The Salazar perspective -- Joe Conzo: reevaluations -- reflections on the king: Ray Santos, Chico Sesma, Jerry González, Poncho Sanchez, and Hilton Ruiz -- Musical style an innovation -- Identity, nationalism, and the aesthetics of Latin music -- The king and I.
Personal Subject:
ISBN:
9780252023323

9780252067785
Format :
Book

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ML419.P82 L6 1999 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area
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Summary

Summary

The first in-depth historical, musical, and cultural look at the career and influence of the king of Latin music.


Summary

He is known as El Rey- the king, and has come to epitomize the Latin experience in music, not just to Latinos throughout the United States and Latin America but to a worldwide audience of all backgrounds. Tito Puente and the Making of Latin Music is the first in-depth historical, musical, and cultural look at the career and the influence of this giant of Latin music. In this seminal work, Steven Loza brings the man and his music, vividly to life through exclusive interviews with Puente and a number of his close associates, including Hilton Ruiz, Ray Santos, Jerry Gonzlez, Poncho Sanchez, and Joe Conzo, as well as music journalist Max Salazar and former DJ/producer Chico Sesma. Loza shows how Puente's music evolved in tandem with the crystallization of Latin music into its current compelling mix of Afro-Cuban music, salsa, and Latin jazz. Tracing Puente's innovations as a drummer and a bandleader, Loza defines his influence over the course of half a century on Latin music as well as on other musicians and musical genres. Loza also delineates the social and cultural history of Latin music, exploring questions of nationalism and ethnic expression, the play between musical creation


Reviews 2

Choice Review

In this reverential portrait, Loza takes a prismatic approach to Puente--a major percussionist, arranger, and band leader in Latin music since the 1940s--using verbatim transcripts of interviews, musical transcriptions of Puente arrangements, song lyrics, and album covers. But despite including a helpful biographical sketch, some rewarding interview material, and a Puente discography, Loza seems principally concerned with ensuring that Puente "ranks with the Ellingtons and the Beethovens" and with making a case for a National Heritage Award for Puente. The penultimate chapter, "Identity, Nationalism, and the Aesthetics of Latin Music," argues that Puerto Rican adoption of Cuban idioms reflects "intercultural compatibility" rather than a "contraction" of nationalism, as scholar Peter Manuel has claimed. In the concluding chapter, "The King and I," Loza ponders the metaphysics of Puente's music: "Puente's music is godlike, as is Augustine's city"--a claim that highlights the book's failure to achieve critical distance from its subject, whom Loza consistently and deferentially treats as "El Rey" (the king). For comprehensive collections serving undergraduates and graduate students, this volume complements more objective, general works on Latin popular music by Vernon Boggs (Salsiology, CH, Oct'92) and John Storm Roberts (Latin Jazz, CH, Nov'99). G. Averill; New York University


Choice Review

In this reverential portrait, Loza takes a prismatic approach to Puente--a major percussionist, arranger, and band leader in Latin music since the 1940s--using verbatim transcripts of interviews, musical transcriptions of Puente arrangements, song lyrics, and album covers. But despite including a helpful biographical sketch, some rewarding interview material, and a Puente discography, Loza seems principally concerned with ensuring that Puente "ranks with the Ellingtons and the Beethovens" and with making a case for a National Heritage Award for Puente. The penultimate chapter, "Identity, Nationalism, and the Aesthetics of Latin Music," argues that Puerto Rican adoption of Cuban idioms reflects "intercultural compatibility" rather than a "contraction" of nationalism, as scholar Peter Manuel has claimed. In the concluding chapter, "The King and I," Loza ponders the metaphysics of Puente's music: "Puente's music is godlike, as is Augustine's city"--a claim that highlights the book's failure to achieve critical distance from its subject, whom Loza consistently and deferentially treats as "El Rey" (the king). For comprehensive collections serving undergraduates and graduate students, this volume complements more objective, general works on Latin popular music by Vernon Boggs (Salsiology, CH, Oct'92) and John Storm Roberts (Latin Jazz, CH, Nov'99). G. Averill; New York University