Cover image for The Brazil reader : history, culture, politics
Title:
The Brazil reader : history, culture, politics
Author:
Levine, Robert M.
Publication Information:
Durham [N.C.] : Duke University Press, 1999.
Physical Description:
x, 527 pages : illustrations, map, music ; 25 cm.
Language:
English
Reading Level:
1340 Lexile.
ISBN:
9780822322580

9780822322900
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Item Holds
Searching...
F2521 .B768 1999 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area
Searching...

On Order

Summary

Summary

Bordering all but two of South America's other nations and by far Latin America's largest country, Brazil differs linguistically, historically, and culturally from Spanish America. Its indigenous peoples share the country with descendants of Portuguese conquerors and the Africans they imported to work as slaves, along with more recent immigrants from southern Europe, Japan, the Middle East, and elsewhere. Capturing the scope of this country's rich diversity and distinction as no other book has done--with more than a hundred entries from a wealth of perspectives-- The Brazil Reader offers a fascinating guide to Brazilian life, culture, and history.

Complementing traditional views with fresh ones, The Brazil Reader's historical selections range from early colonization to the present day, with sections on imperial and republican Brazil, the days of slavery, the Vargas years, and the more recent return to democracy. They include letters, photographs, interviews, legal documents, visual art, music, poetry, fiction, reminiscences, and scholarly analyses. They also include observations by ordinary residents, both urban and rural, as well as foreign visitors and experts on Brazil. Probing beneath the surface of Brazilian reality--past and present-- The Reader looks at social behavior, women's lives, architecture, literature, sexuality, popular culture, and strategies for coping with the travails of life in a country where the affluent live in walled compounds to separate themselves from the millions of Brazilians hard-pressed to find food and shelter. Contributing to a full geographic account--from the Amazon to the Northeast and the Central-South--of this country's singular multiplicity, many pieces have been written expressly for this volume or were translated for it, having never previously been published in English.

This second book in The Latin America Readers series will interest students, specialists, travelers for both business and leisure, and those desiring an in-depth introduction to Brazilian life and culture.


Summary

Bordering all but two of South America's other nations and by far Latin America's largest country, Brazil differs linguistically, historically, and culturally from Spanish America. Its indigenous peoples share the country with descendants of Portuguese conquerors and the Africans they imported to work as slaves, along with more recent immigrants from southern Europe, Japan, the Middle East, and elsewhere. Capturing the scope of this country's rich diversity and distinction as no other book has done--with more than a hundred entries from a wealth of perspectives-- The Brazil Reader offers a fascinating guide to Brazilian life, culture, and history.

Complementing traditional views with fresh ones, The Brazil Reader's historical selections range from early colonization to the present day, with sections on imperial and republican Brazil, the days of slavery, the Vargas years, and the more recent return to democracy. They include letters, photographs, interviews, legal documents, visual art, music, poetry, fiction, reminiscences, and scholarly analyses. They also include observations by ordinary residents, both urban and rural, as well as foreign visitors and experts on Brazil. Probing beneath the surface of Brazilian reality--past and present-- The Reader looks at social behavior, women's lives, architecture, literature, sexuality, popular culture, and strategies for coping with the travails of life in a country where the affluent live in walled compounds to separate themselves from the millions of Brazilians hard-pressed to find food and shelter. Contributing to a full geographic account--from the Amazon to the Northeast and the Central-South--of this country's singular multiplicity, many pieces have been written expressly for this volume or were translated for it, having never previously been published in English.

This second book in The Latin America Readers series will interest students, specialists, travelers for both business and leisure, and those desiring an in-depth introduction to Brazilian life and culture.


Author Notes

Robert M. Levine is Professor of History and Director of Latin American Studies at the University of Miami. He has published extensively on Brazil and is former chair of the Columbia University Seminar on Brazil. His previous books include The Brazilian Photographs of Genevieve Naylor, 1940-1942, and Images of History, both also published by Duke University Press.
John J. Crocitti is completing his Ph.D. in history at the University of Miami. His work has focused on the social and demographic history of the Volta Redonda region, the site of Brazil's first steel mill.


Robert M. Levine is Professor of History and Director of Latin American Studies at the University of Miami. He has published extensively on Brazil and is former chair of the Columbia University Seminar on Brazil. His previous books include The Brazilian Photographs of Genevieve Naylor, 1940-1942, and Images of History, both also published by Duke University Press.
John J. Crocitti is completing his Ph.D. in history at the University of Miami. His work has focused on the social and demographic history of the Volta Redonda region, the site of Brazil's first steel mill.


Reviews 2

Choice Review

Levine and Crocitti's nine-part kaleidoscopic volume describes the Brazilian historical consciousness by including "history from below" as well as "history from above." The stand-alone chapters outline Brazil's history from its early origins to the recent return to democratic life. Eclectic entries written by both native and nonnative intellectuals as well as "ordinary citizens" span ideologies and geographical regions to "probe beneath the surface of stereotype." This collection is a rich, multilayered historical documentation of Brazilian life, which includes letters, photographs, artwork, analyses of songs, interviews, official reports, and laws. Brazilian laws and lyrics presented together capture both historical rhyme and reason. There are chapters on women's lives, race and ethnic relations, and saudade, the Brazilian term for longing and nostalgia. Focusing on political culture as well as politics, the editors' goal is to present a variety of simultaneous voices that depict the complex and nuanced totality of Brazil's socially constructed reality. A unique and well-crafted volume for both the seasoned and newcomers to Brazilian history. All levels. P. E. Herideen; Holyoke Community College


Choice Review

Levine and Crocitti's nine-part kaleidoscopic volume describes the Brazilian historical consciousness by including "history from below" as well as "history from above." The stand-alone chapters outline Brazil's history from its early origins to the recent return to democratic life. Eclectic entries written by both native and nonnative intellectuals as well as "ordinary citizens" span ideologies and geographical regions to "probe beneath the surface of stereotype." This collection is a rich, multilayered historical documentation of Brazilian life, which includes letters, photographs, artwork, analyses of songs, interviews, official reports, and laws. Brazilian laws and lyrics presented together capture both historical rhyme and reason. There are chapters on women's lives, race and ethnic relations, and saudade, the Brazilian term for longing and nostalgia. Focusing on political culture as well as politics, the editors' goal is to present a variety of simultaneous voices that depict the complex and nuanced totality of Brazil's socially constructed reality. A unique and well-crafted volume for both the seasoned and newcomers to Brazilian history. All levels. P. E. Herideen; Holyoke Community College


Table of Contents

Acknowledgments
A Note on Style
Introduction
I Origins, Conquest, and Colonial Rule
The Origin of FireCayapo Legend
Noble SavagesJohn Hemming
A Description of the Tupinamba
The First WaveWarren Dean
Letter to Governor Tome de SousaManoel da Nobrega
From the River of JeneroFrancisco Suares
The Sins of MaranhaoAntonio Vieira
Minas Uprising of 1720
Smuggling in the Diamond DistrictGeorge Gardner
Decree Elevating Brazil to a KingdomJoao VI
II Imperial and Republican Brazil
Declaration of Brazilian Independence, 1822Pedro I
The Baron of ParnaibaGeorge Gardner
Uprising in Maranhao, 1839-1840Domingos Jose Goncalves de Magalhaes
A Paraiba Plantation, 1850-1860Stanley J. Stein
The Paraguayan War Victory ParadePeter M. Beattie
A Vanishing Way of LifeGilberto Freyre
A Mirror of ProgressDain Borges
Drought and the Image of the NortheastGerald M. Greenfield
Dom Pedro the MagnanimousMary Wilhelmine Williams
Solemn Inaugural Session of December 24, 1900
Intellectuals at PlayOlavo Bilac Colllection
City of MistManoel Sousa Pinto
The Civilist CampaignJ. R. Lobao
Gaucho Leaders, 1923
Factory Rules, 1924
III Slavery and Its Aftermath
The War against Palmares
Slave Life at Morro Velho MineSir Richard Francis Burton
Scenes from the Slave TradeLogbook Entries Joao Dunshee de Abrantes
Cruelty to SlavesThomas Ewbank
Slavery and SocietyJoaquim Nabuco
Abolition Decree, 1888Princess Isabel and Rodrigo Augusto da Silva
Laws Regulating Beggars in Minas Gerais, 1900
IV The Vargas Era
The Social Question
Manifesto, May 1930Luis Carlos Prestes
Heroes of the Revolution
The "Gold for Sao Paulo" Building, 1932Cristina Mehrtens
Where They Talk about Rosa LuxemburgPatricia Galvao
Two Versions of Factory Life
Seized Correspondence from Communists, 1935-1945 / Dossier 20, Police Archives
The Paulista SynagogueGustavo Barroso
Why the Estado Novo?Oliveira Vianna
New Year's Address, 1938Getulio Vargas
Rural Life
A New Survey of Brazilian Life
General George C. Marshall's Mission to BrazilKatherine Tupper Marshall
Comments on the Estado NovoBailey W. Diffie
Educational Reform after Twenty YearsAnisio S. Teixeira
Ordinary People: Five Lives Affected by Vargas-Era ReformsApolonio de Carvalho and Geraldo Valdelirios Novais and Frederico Heller and Maurilio Thomas Ferreira and Joana de Masi Zero
Vargas's Suicide Letter, 1954Getulio Vargas
V Seeking Democracy and Equity
Rehearsal for the CoupAraken Tavora
The Military RegimeAntonio Pedro Tota
Excerpts from the 1967 Brazilian Constitution
Tropicalism and Brazilian Popular Music under Military RuleChristopher Dunn
Literature under the DictatorshipElizabeth Ginway
Pele SpeaksEdson Arantes Nascimento da Silva
The Maximum Norm of the Exercise of LibertyGrupo da Educacao Moral e Civica
Families of Fishermen Confront the SharksPaulo Lima
The Reality of the Brazilian CountrysideLandless Movement (MST)
The "Greatest Administrative Scandal"Seth Garfield
Life on an Occupied ShipMarcal Joao Scarante
A Letter from BrazilJuliano Spyer
Inaugural AddressFernando Henrique Cardoso
Fernando Henrique Cardoso: Theory and PracticeTed G. Goertzel
Is Brazil Hopelessly Corrupt?Roberto DaMatta
VI Women's Lives
Aunt Zeze's TearsEmilia Moncorva Bandeira de Mello
Tarsila and the 1920sCarol Damian and Cristina Mehrtens
The Integral WomanProvincia de Guanabara
The Children Always Had MilkMaria Puerta Ferreira
Women of the ForestYolanda and Robert F. Murphy
My LifeMaria das Dores Gomes Batista
A Healer's StoryMaria Geralda Ferreira
Sonia, a Middle-Class WomanAlison Raphael
Family Life in RecifeFanny Mitchell
Xuxa and the Televisual ImaginaryAmelia Simpson
Dreams of Uneducated WomenJose Carlos Sebe Bom Meihy
VII Race and Ethnic Relations
A Letter from Brazil, 1918Jose Clarana
Growing Up Black in Minas GeraisCarolina Maria de Jesus
Exotic Peoples
Brazil: Study in Black, Brown, and BeigeLeslie B. Rout Jr.
Immigrant Ethnicity in BrazilJeffrey Lesser
The Myth of Racial DemocracyAbdias do Nascimento
The National Day against RacismRevista MNU
The Church Tries to Combat PrejudiceBernardete Toneto
What Color Are You?
Mixed BloodJefferson M. Fish
VIII Realities
The Animal GameClayton S. Cooper
How Brazil WorksRobert M. Levine
Iansa Is Not Santa BarbaraIle Axe Opo Afonja
Upward Mobility Is PossibleAlcides Nazario Guerreiro Bruto
Crab and YoghurtTobias Hecht
Voices from the PavementClaudia Milito and Helio R. S. Silva
Pixote's FateRobert M. Levine
A Letter to President CardosoCaius Brandao
The History of the Huni Kui PeopleSia Kaxinawa
Urban IndiansJuliano Spyer
Mayor Orders Billboard Shacks DestroyedJuliana Raposo
Cultural Imperialism at Its Most FashionableRoger M. Allen
The Gay and Lesbian Movement in BrazilJames N. Green
Liberation Theology's Rise and FallRobin Nagle
IX Saudades
Bananas Is My BusinessHelena Solberg
The Invention of Tradition on Brazilian RadioBryan McCann
Bahia Music StoryBill Hinchberger
O Axe de ZumbiPaulo Lima and Bernadete Toneto
At CarnivalPedro Ribeiro
Two Poets Sing the New WorldJessica Callaway
Two Essays on SportsJanet Lever and Jose Carlos Sebe Bom Methy
Suggestions for Further Reading
Acknowledgment of Copyrights
Index
Acknowledgments
A Note on Style
Introduction
I Origins, Conquest, and Colonial Rule
The Origin of FireCayapo Legend
Noble SavagesJohn Hemming
A Description of the Tupinamba
The First WaveWarren Dean
Letter to Governor Tome de SousaManoel da Nobrega
From the River of JeneroFrancisco Suares
The Sins of MaranhaoAntonio Vieira
Minas Uprising of 1720
Smuggling in the Diamond DistrictGeorge Gardner
Decree Elevating Brazil to a KingdomJoao VI
II Imperial and Republican Brazil
Declaration of Brazilian Independence, 1822Pedro I
The Baron of ParnaibaGeorge Gardner
Uprising in Maranhao, 1839-1840Domingos Jose Goncalves de Magalhaes
A Paraiba Plantation, 1850-1860Stanley J. Stein
The Paraguayan War Victory ParadePeter M. Beattie
A Vanishing Way of LifeGilberto Freyre
A Mirror of ProgressDain Borges
Drought and the Image of the NortheastGerald M. Greenfield
Dom Pedro the MagnanimousMary Wilhelmine Williams
Solemn Inaugural Session of December 24, 1900
Intellectuals at PlayOlavo Bilac Colllection
City of MistManoel Sousa Pinto
The Civilist CampaignJ. R. Lobao
Gaucho Leaders, 1923
Factory Rules, 1924
III Slavery and Its Aftermath
The War against Palmares
Slave Life at Morro Velho MineSir Richard Francis Burton
Scenes from the Slave TradeLogbook Entries Joao Dunshee de Abrantes
Cruelty to SlavesThomas Ewbank
Slavery and SocietyJoaquim Nabuco
Abolition Decree, 1888Princess Isabel and Rodrigo Augusto da Silva
Laws Regulating Beggars in Minas Gerais, 1900
IV The Vargas Era
The Social Question
Manifesto, May 1930Luis Carlos Prestes
Heroes of the Revolution
The "Gold for Sao Paulo" Building, 1932Cristina Mehrtens
Where They Talk about Rosa LuxemburgPatricia Galvao
Two Versions of Factory Life
Seized Correspondence from Communists, 1935-1945 / Dossier 20, Police Archives
The Paulista SynagogueGustavo Barroso
Why the Estado Novo?Oliveira Vianna
New Year's Address, 1938Getulio Vargas
Rural Life
A New Survey of Brazilian Life
General George C. Marshall's Mission to BrazilKatherine Tupper Marshall
Comments on the Estado NovoBailey W. Diffie
Educational Reform after Twenty YearsAnisio S. Teixeira
Ordinary People: Five Lives Affected by Vargas-Era ReformsApolonio de Carvalho and Geraldo Valdelirios Novais and Frederico Heller and Maurilio Thomas Ferreira and Joana de Masi Zero
Vargas's Suicide Letter, 1954Getulio Vargas
V Seeking Democracy and Equity
Rehearsal for the CoupAraken Tavora
The Military RegimeAntonio Pedro Tota
Excerpts from the 1967 Brazilian Constitution
Tropicalism and Brazilian Popular Music under Military RuleChristopher Dunn
Literature under the DictatorshipElizabeth Ginway
Pele SpeaksEdson Arantes Nascimento da Silva
The Maximum Norm of the Exercise of LibertyGrupo da Educacao Moral e Civica
Families of Fishermen Confront the SharksPaulo Lima
The Reality of the Brazilian CountrysideLandless Movement (MST)
The "Greatest Administrative Scandal"Seth Garfield
Life on an Occupied ShipMarcal Joao Scarante
A Letter from BrazilJuliano Spyer
Inaugural AddressFernando Henrique Cardoso
Fernando Henrique Cardoso: Theory and PracticeTed G. Goertzel
Is Brazil Hopelessly Corrupt?Roberto DaMatta
VI Women's Lives
Aunt Zeze's TearsEmilia Moncorva Bandeira de Mello
Tarsila and the 1920sCarol Damian and Cristina Mehrtens
The Integral WomanProvincia de Guanabara
The Children Always Had MilkMaria Puerta Ferreira
Women of the ForestYolanda and Robert F. Murphy
My LifeMaria das Dores Gomes Batista
A Healer's StoryMaria Geralda Ferreira
Sonia, a Middle-Class WomanAlison Raphael
Family Life in RecifeFanny Mitchell
Xuxa and the Televisual ImaginaryAmelia Simpson
Dreams of Uneducated WomenJose Carlos Sebe Bom Meihy
VII Race and Ethnic Relations
A Letter from Brazil, 1918Jose Clarana
Growing Up Black in Minas GeraisCarolina Maria de Jesus
Exotic Peoples
Brazil: Study in Black, Brown, and BeigeLeslie B. Rout Jr.
Immigrant Ethnicity in BrazilJeffrey Lesser
The Myth of Racial DemocracyAbdias do Nascimento
The National Day against RacismRevista MNU
The Church Tries to Combat PrejudiceBernardete Toneto
What Color Are You?
Mixed BloodJefferson M. Fish
VIII Realities
The Animal GameClayton S. Cooper
How Brazil WorksRobert M. Levine
Iansa Is Not Santa BarbaraIle Axe Opo Afonja
Upward Mobility Is PossibleAlcides Nazario Guerreiro Bruto
Crab and YoghurtTobias Hecht
Voices from the PavementClaudia Milito and Helio R. S. Silva
Pixote's FateRobert M. Levine
A Letter to President CardosoCaius Brandao
The History of the Huni Kui PeopleSia Kaxinawa
Urban IndiansJuliano Spyer
Mayor Orders Billboard Shacks DestroyedJuliana Raposo
Cultural Imperialism at Its Most FashionableRoger M. Allen
The Gay and Lesbian Movement in BrazilJames N. Green
Liberation Theology's Rise and FallRobin Nagle
IX Saudades
Bananas Is My BusinessHelena Solberg
The Invention of Tradition on Brazilian RadioBryan McCann
Bahia Music StoryBill Hinchberger
O Axe de ZumbiPaulo Lima and Bernadete Toneto
At CarnivalPedro Ribeiro
Two Poets Sing the New WorldJessica Callaway
Two Essays on SportsJanet Lever and Jose Carlos Sebe Bom Methy
Suggestions for Further Reading
Acknowledgment of Copyrights
Index