Cover image for Maggie Cassidy
Title:
Maggie Cassidy
Author:
Kerouac, Jack, 1922-1969.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : Penguin Books, 1993.

©1959
Physical Description:
194 pages ; 20 cm
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780140179064
Format :
Book

Available:*

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Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library X Adult Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Summary

Summary

"When someone asks 'Where does [Kerouac] get that stuff?' say: 'From you!' He lay awake all night listening with eyes and ears. A night of a thousand years. Heard it in the womb, heard it in the cradle, heard it in school , heard it on the floor of life's stock exchange where dreams are traded for gold." --Henry Miller

One of the dozen books written by Jack Kerouac in the early and mid-1950s, Maggie Cassidy was not published until 1959, after the appearance of On the Road had made its author famous overnight, Long out of print, this touching novel of adolescent love in a New England mill town, with its straight-forward narrative structure, is one of Kerouac's most accesible works. It is a remarkable , bittersweet evocation of the awkwardness and the joy of growing up in America.


Author Notes

Jack Kerouac was born in Lowell, Massachusetts, in 1922. His first novel, The Town and the City, was published in 1950. He considered all of his "true story novels," including On the Road, to be chapters of "one vast book," his autobiographical Legend of Duluoz.

He died in St. Petersburg, Florida, in 1969 at the age of forty-seven.

(Publisher Provided) Jack Kerouac, March 12, 1922 - October 21, 1969 Jean Louis Kerouac, better known as Jack Kerouac, was born on March 12, 1922 in Lowell, Massachusetts. Kerouac studied briefly at Columbia University before dropping out to join the Merchant Marines. During this time and despite his parents' disapproval, he befriended a group of young Columbia students and began work on a novel with the help of Allen Ginsberg, the author of the avant-garde poem, Howl. Kerouac's first novel, The Town and the City, was based on the torments he suffered as he tried to balance his wild city life with his old-world family values.

Kerouac's next novel, On the Road, a work inspired by Kerouac's cross-country trips with his friend Neal Cassady, was rejected for seven years before it was finally published. Hailed the finest novel on the "Beat Generation", On the Road explores an era of experimentation and void in the author and his culture. With its success, Kerouac achieved the fame he sought. In subsequent years, he wrote many more novels, including Doctor Sax, Lonesome Traveler, and Big Sur. Kerouac is generally considered to be the father of the Beat movement, although he actively disliked such labels. He reportedly wrote his prose spontaneously and without edits. He always carried a notebook which helped him to form free-flowing prose at a moment's notice.

After years of alcohol abuse, Kerouac suffered from an internal hemorrhage caused by cirrhosis of the liver. He died at his home on October 21, 1969, at the age of 47.

(Bowker Author Biography)


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