Cover image for The cat in ancient Egypt
Title:
The cat in ancient Egypt
Author:
Málek, Jaromír.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Philadelphia, Pa. : University of Pennsylvania Press, 1997.

©1993
Physical Description:
144 pages : illustrations (some color) ; 25 cm
General Note:
Originally published: London : British Museum Press, 1993.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780812216325
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library DT61 .M288 1993 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area
Searching...

On Order

Summary

Summary

Cat fanciers who consider their pets majestic have history on their side: felines were domesticated in ancient Egypt around 2000 B.C. while their European cousins still ran wild. Over the centuries they gained an exalted position in royal society--revered as an incarnation of a goddess, modeled in bronze statuettes, and even mummified and buried with their owners. Yet cats also won commoners' respect for their humble origins and protective instincts, earning them a prominent place in the personal religion of ordinary people.

Egypt scholar Jaromir Malek has called on a variety of artistic and written sources to tell how the cat became one of the most widely esteemed animals in that ancient society. He shows how we can date the domestication of cats from their depiction in art--first from the tomb of Baket III, in which a cat is shown confronting a field rat; then increasingly in images where cats are seen under the chairs of wives, a depiction that complements the long-established motif of dogs situated beneath the husbands' chair.

His book includes more than a hundred illustrations--many in full color--that show how cats came to be widely represented in tomb paintings, sculpture, papyri, jewelry, ostraka, and sarcophagi. Throughout the text, he provides sufficient information on ancient Egyptian religion, society, and art to help general readers understand how the cat achieved its place of honor.

Today cats can be seen throughout Egypt, wandering in bazaars or asleep in shaded courtyards, evidence of an enduring relationship with humans that this book warmly captures. The Cat in Ancient Egypt is an informative and entertaining work that will delight cat lovers and history buffs alike.


Author Notes

Jaromir Malek holds a doctorate in Egyptology from Charles University, Prague and is the editor of the Topographical Bibliography of Ancient Egyptian Hieroglyphic Texts, Reliefs, and Paintings. He resides in Oxford, England.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Google Preview