Cover image for What they didn't teach you about the American Revolution
Title:
What they didn't teach you about the American Revolution
Author:
Wright, Mike, 1938-
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Novato, CA : Presidio, [1999]

©1999
Physical Description:
xiv, 343 pages, 8 unnumbered pages of plates : illustrations ; 23 cm
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780891416685
Format :
Book

Available:*

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Central Library E209 .W77 1999 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area
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Newstead Library E209 .W77 1999 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Clearfield Library E209 .W77 1999 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Dudley Branch Library E209 .W77 1999 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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East Aurora Library E209 .W77 1999 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Summary

Summary

What made the founding fathers so great (Or were they?). And don't forget the founding mothers. We have intrigue and skulduggery with spies from Nathan Hale to Benedict Arnold, including enlightening stops on the distaff side of espionage for Patience Wright, Lydia Darragh, and Ann Bates.


Author Notes

Mike Wright is the author of the "What They Didn't Teach You ..." books. In addition to the American Revolution, he has tackled the Civil War, World War II, & the Wild West. Future volumes will cover the sixties & the twentieth century. Wright, an Emmy-winning television writer, lives in Chicago.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 1

Booklist Review

In previous volumes of this series, Wright presumed to enlighten us on "secrets" of the Civil War and World War II. Here, he proclaims his goal of demythologizing our founding fathers and the cause for which they fought. For serious students of history, Wright's revelations must seem pompous; little here is new, and in repeating as fact many unverifiable but oft-repeated claims, Wright helps foster new mythologies. Still, he covers the gamut of the revolutionary era with a highly readable, breezy narrative style, and some of his speculations eloquently illustrate the ironies always present in grand historical movements. For general readers, this work will inform, amuse, and occasionally provide an interesting perspective on the Revolution. --Jay Freeman


Table of Contents

Acknowledgmentsp. viii
Chronologyp. ix
Introductionp. xii
1. Prelude to Independence: Revolution, Dogma, and Stampsp. 1
2. Founding Fathers, Part One: A Farmer, a Lawyer, and a Sagep. 36
3. Founding Fathers, Part Two: Best Actors in Supporting Rolesp. 85
4. Benedict the Bold: Arnold the Traitorp. 155
5. G. Washington: The Myth Who Would Be Manp. 172
6. Founding Mothers: Hear Them Roarp. 180
7. Rag-Tag and Bob-Tail: If It Moves, Salute Itp. 197
8. Tea Parties and Rude Bridges: Little Things That Mean A Lotp. 207
9. Who, What, and Where: Big, Bigger, and Not So Bigp. 231
10. Revolutionary Potpourri: Bits of This and Thatp. 235
11. Rituals of Life: History with the Bark onp. 259
12. And the Winner Is?: The Trenches of Yorktownp. 269
13. The Constitution: "We the People"p. 284
14. The Sting of Death: Final Acts, Final Honorsp. 291
Epilogue: Personal Thoughts on the American Revolutionp. 321
Bibliographyp. 324
Indexp. 335

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