Cover image for Influenza 1918 : the worst epidemic in American history
Title:
Influenza 1918 : the worst epidemic in American history
Author:
Iezzoni, Lynette.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : TV Books, [1999]

©1999
Physical Description:
238 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
General Note:
This is the companion book to the television documentary "Influenza 1918" aired on PBS's documentary series "The American Experience."
Language:
English
ISBN:
9781575001081
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library RC150.4 .I39 1999 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Central Library RC150.4 .I39 1999 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area
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Clearfield Library RC150.4 .I39 1999 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Hamburg Library RC150.4 .I39 1999 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Orchard Park Library RC150.4 .I39 1999 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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On Order

Summary

Summary

Influenza 1918 is the true story of the worst epidemic the United States has ever known -- a deadly virus that made its silent appearance 80 years ago at the start of World War I and went on to take the lives of over 600,000 Americans. In one month alone, October 1918, over 195,000 Americans were stricken with the disease and died. In Philadelphia, the city could not cope -- the dead were left in gutters and stacked in caskets on front porches. People hid indoors, afraid to interact with their friends and neighbors. "If the epidemic continues its mathematical rate of acceleration", warned the Surgeon General, "civilization could easily disappear from the face of the earth within a few weeks".


Reviews 1

Choice Review

It is very rare that a work of medical history can be described as a "page turner," a term more associated with the fiction of Anne Rice or John Grisham, but Iezzoni has pulled off that feat. This is fitting, because she is a creative writer rather than a scholar, and what has been produced here is "History Light" or "Lite." Although many of the first-person voices quoted in the book are engrossing, there is very little solid information conveyed, and none that is new to the scholarly world. From a factual perspective, this book would have made a good article, but despite this, it is a "good read." The question is, For whom? Certainly not for professionals or scholars. If there is a general audience for a book about the greatest influenza epidemic of the 20th century, this is it. Does the documentary film Influenza 1918, broadcast on public television's The American Experience, really need this companion volume? The answer is best left to the marketplace. All levels. I. Richman Pennsylvania State University, Harrisburg


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