Cover image for The quiet little woman ; Tilly's Christmas ; Rosa's tale : three enchanting Christmas stories
Title:
The quiet little woman ; Tilly's Christmas ; Rosa's tale : three enchanting Christmas stories
Author:
Alcott, Louisa May, 1832-1888.
Publication Information:
Tulsa, Okla. : Honor Books, [1999]

©1999
Physical Description:
122 pages : illustrations ; 19 cm
Language:
English
ISBN:
9781562926168
Format :
Book

Available:*

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Central Library FICTION Adult Fiction Central Library
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On Order

Summary

Summary

In the 1870s, Louisa May Alcott made friends with five earnest fans of her best-selling Little Women. The young Lukens girls had written to Miss Alcott telling her that they were so inspired by the examples of Meg, Jo, Beth, and Amy, that they, too, were launching their own literary publication.


Author Notes

Louisa May Alcott was born in Germantown, Pennsylvania, in 1832. Two years later, she moved with her family to Boston and in 1840 to Concord, which was to remain her family home for the rest of her life. Her father, Bronson Alcott, was a transcendentalist and friend of Ralph Waldo Emerson and Henry David Thoreau. Alcott early realized that her father could not be counted on as sole support of his family, and so she sacrificed much of her own pleasure to earn money by sewing, teaching, and churning out potboilers. Her reputation was established with Hospital Sketches (1863), which was an account of her work as a volunteer nurse in Washington, D.C.

Alcott's first works were written for children, including her best-known Little Women (1868--69) and Little Men: Life at Plumfield with Jo's Boys (1871). Moods (1864), a "passionate conflict," was written for adults. Alcott's writing eventually became the family's main source of income.

Throughout her life, Alcott continued to produce highly popular and idealistic literature for children. An Old-Fashioned Girl (1870), Eight Cousins (1875), Rose in Bloom (1876), Under the Lilacs (1878), and Jack and Jill (1881) enjoyed wide popularity. At the same time, her adult fiction, such as the autobiographical novel Work: A Story of Experience (1873) and A Modern Mephistopheles (1877), a story based on the Faust legend, shows her deeper concern with such social issues as education, prison reform, and women's suffrage. She realistically depicts the problems of adolescents and working women, the difficulties of relationships between men and women, and the values of the single woman's life.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

Newly discovered writing of classic writers is big business, like Alcott's romance The Inheritance, first published in 1997. However, this one is not really a new discovery but, rather, a "re-discovery." Alcott wrote the story for a family magazine of five young readers; then it appeared in 1872 in Aunt Jo's Scrap-Bag, a six-volume collection of Alcott stories; and then again in 1920 in St Nicholas Magazine. This time we're told it's in a small "stand-alone" volume (except that there are also two more Christmas stories included, presumably to fill up space). The intrepid rediscoverer is Stephen Hines, who also published the best-selling Little House in the Ozarks: The Rediscovered Writings (of Laura Ingalls Wilder) in 1991. He provides notes at the back on the morals of the stories as well as a short Alcott biography. The design is very much a Christmas package in gilt and red. It's a little book, and that word little is in the title and on almost every page. Is it worth reading? The first part of the title story is an elemental Cinderella scenario of the lonely little orphan, who is pure, brave, and slightly disabled (only slightly), the one longing for a loving home but never chosen for adoption. After that, it's all downhill, and the other two stories are precious children's morality tales. Alcott fans will grab the package, but not for long. --Hazel Rochman


Library Journal Review

Alcott first published this holiday story in 1872; it was reprinted in a magazine in 1920 but had since disappearedÄuntil now. Along with the full text, this beautiful edition contains several new illustrations by C. Michael Dudash. Start your Christmas shopping early this year. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


School Library Journal Review

Gr 4-7-Three Christmas stories, at least one of which was "rediscovered" in a children's magazine of its day. The first and longest selection is about Patty, an orphan whose greatest dream is to be adopted; instead, she is given a place as a servant in the Murray family. Through Patty's loving nature, plus the Christmastime intervention of Aunt Jane, the family members realize that they have a gem in their midst. The other two stories are shorter-one involves a poor girl whose kindness to a tiny bird prods a mean neighbor into an act of charity; the other features a horse, able to speak through the Christmas miracle, that tells her story of kindness and cruelty suffered at the hands of humans. All three pieces have an undeniably 19th-century tone that may strike today's readers as too sentimental and quaint to be interesting. However, Alcott's fans will zip right through these stories and take pleasure in the satisfyingly happy endings, in which goodness and endurance triumph over adversity.-E.M. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Table of Contents

Introductionp. 7
The Quiet Little Woman
The Orphanagep. 15
Getting Adoptedp. 17
Aunt Janep. 21
A Chance at Lastp. 27
How Things Wentp. 29
A Christmas Gatheringp. 33
Aunt Jane Takes Actionp. 37
The Family Comes Homep. 45
A Place for Pattyp. 51
Patty Remembersp. 55
Tilly's Christmas
A Christmas Storyp. 59
Rosa's Tale
A Christmas Storyp. 77
The Editor's Notesp. 107
About the Authorp. 115
About the Presenterp. 121

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