Cover image for Solar eclipse
Title:
Solar eclipse
Author:
Farris, John.
Personal Author:
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
New York : Tom Doherty Associates, 1999.
Physical Description:
399 pages ; 25 cm
General Note:
"A Forge book."
Language:
English
Geographic Term:
ISBN:
9780312850722
Format :
Book

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Central Library X Adult Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Alden Ewell Free Library X Adult Fiction Open Shelf
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Summary

Summary

After a stuntwoman's Chevy Tahoe is forced off the road, she and her daughter walk to a lone house for help, only to find the occupants sitting at the dinner table--with bullets in their foreheads.


Author Notes

John Farris was born in Jefferson City, Missouri in 1936. He attended Southwestern College in Memphis. He sold his first novel the summer after he graduated from high school, in 1955. His other books include King Windom, The Long Light of Dawn, The Captors, Nightfall, Dragonfly, Elvisland, Phantom Nights, and Before the Night Ends.

Many of his books were adapted into movies. Harrison High was adapted into the film Because They're Young in 1960 and When Michael Calls was adapted in 1969. The Fury was the basis for the 1978 film, which Farris wrote the screenplay. He wrote and directed the film Dear Dead Delilah in 1972.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 1

Booklist Review

Ex-DEA agent Tobin Bonner, now comfortably settled as a Utah county sheriff, is surprised to discover just how hectic small-town law enforcement can be. This story about a murdered family, a rather twisted religious group, and a whole lot of deception and double-dealing should appeal to just about anyone who likes mainstream mystery fiction. Veteran crime novelist Farris once again demonstrates that he knows how to tell a story and develop characters. Bonner is an extremely likable protagonist, as is his sidekick, Shay Waco, a Hollywood stuntwoman who's come to Utah for a reunion with her estranged father. What's especially nice about this novel is the way it keeps getting more and more complicated (not to mention darker and darker), leaving readers wondering how Farris is possibly going to wrap it all up. Wrap it up he does, though not in a neat little package but in an exciting, skillful way that will leave readers gasping for breath. Not many suspense novels are as ambitiously intricate as this one; fewer still are as successful. --David Pitt


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