Cover image for Chemical elements : from carbon to krypton
Title:
Chemical elements : from carbon to krypton
Author:
Newton, David E.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Detroit : U·X·L, [1999]

©1999
Physical Description:
3 volumes (lxxvii, 686 pages) : illustrations (some color) ; 25 cm
Language:
English
Contents:
v. 1. A-F -- v. 2. G-O -- v. 3. P-Z.
Subject Term:
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780787628444

9780787628451

9780787628468

9780787628475
Format :
Book

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Central Library QD466 .N464 1999 V.1 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Clarence Library QD466 .N464 1999 V.3 Adult Non-Fiction Reference material
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Clarence Library QD466 .N464 1999 V.1 Adult Non-Fiction Reference material
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East Aurora Library QD466 .N464 1999 V.1 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Summary

Summary

Describes the structure, chemical properties, common compounds, and practical uses for each element.


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

Designed especially for students in middle school, but also appropriate for high school, this three-volume introduction to the chemical elements meets its stated objective of providing "a valuable source of fundamental information for research reports, science fair projects, classroom demonstrations," and supplemental textbook information. The 112 elements of the periodic table are arranged alphabetically by chemical name, with the exception of elements 101^-112, which are discussed under the entry transfermium elements. Although the entries vary in length (e.g., actinium is three pages long, carbon is twelve pages), each follows the same format. The first page outlines "basic information about the chemical element: its chemical symbol, atomic number, atomic mass, family and pronunciation." It includes a diagram of an atom with the electrons arranged in energy levels outside the nucleus and the number of protons and neutrons indicated inside the nucleus. The entry then discusses the element's discovery and naming, physical and chemical properties, occurrence in nature, isotopes, methods of extraction, important compounds and uses, and health effects. Sidebars within the entries highlight commonly used terms, well-known products, interesting facts, and scientists. Access to the entries is provided by three tables of contents: by chemical name, by atomic number, and finally, by family group. A cumulative index in each volume provides still another means of access. The volumes also include a time line of the elements by year of discovery and a bibliography. The bibliography suggests print sources and Web sites on chemistry in general and on individual elements. Most of the print sources are copyrighted in the 1980s and 1990s, with many appropriate for the set's age group. More than 200 black-and-white illustrations and photographs, with three eight-page color-photo inserts, comprise the set's visuals. The black-and-white illustrations and photographs are often murky. The "Words to Know" sections function as a glossary and may prove useful for a science vocabulary lesson. Chemical Elements fits in nicely with other titles for this age group. Grolier's The Elements [RBB Ja 1 & 15 97], with its wonderful color photographs, does not discuss all the elements. Oxford's Guide to the Elements [RBB D 1 96] discusses all the elements, but the layout is not as report-writing friendly. Information on elements can be found in McGraw-Hill Encyclopedia of Science & Technology (8th ed., 1997) and Van Nostrand's Scientific Encyclopedia (8th ed., 1994), but these are more appropriate for advanced-placement students. Given the reasonable price, consider purchasing one set for reference and two or three for circulation at report-writing time. Recommended for school and public libraries.


School Library Journal Review

Gr 7 Up-Each alphabetical entry in this set begins with a diagram of the element under discussion; a picture of its symbol; and information on its atomic number, mass, family group, and pronunciation. The clear and concise text that follows covers the element's discovery and naming; physical and chemical properties; occurrence in nature and methods of extraction; and its isotopes, compounds, uses, and health effects. Each element is covered in a separate article, except for the transfermium elements, which are grouped together. The relationships depicted in the periodic table are identified but not explained. However, there are good cross-references to other articles when two elements share some connections, e.g., potassium and argon. Sidebars present information on related topics, scientists, and the history of the science. "Words to Know" are listed in the margin. Some of the black-and-white and full-color illustrations are informative; others are merely decorative. Additional tables of contents of the elements arranged by atomic number and by family group are included. The up-to-date bibliography features many standard works on the subject and is supplemented by titles on specific elements, addresses of associations, and Web pages. This set compares favorably with Albert Stwertka's A Guide to the Elements (Oxford Univ., 1998). David Heiserman's Exploring Chemical Elements and Their Compounds (McGraw-Hill, 1991) is somewhat more technical. The multivolume Elements (Grolier, 1996) is more attractive and deals better with groups of elements but isn't as good at focusing on a single element as Newton's set.-Jeffrey A. French, Euclid Public Library, OH (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Choice Review

This "encyclopedia" describes each chemical element; a proper subtitle would have been "From Actinium to Zirconium." Each element is described in five to seven pages of reasonably up-to-date, readable information (the isotope paragraph, repeated 100 times, is irritating to readers). Newton should not have called neutrons "very small particles"; for the intended readership, a very small particle means "dust" or "sand." The author claims to provide fundamental information for research reports, science fair projects, and classroom demonstrations; this reviewer, reading about some 30 elements, saw no useful classroom demonstrations. These books might be useful in a high school or junior high library setting but not at higher educational levels. One wishes that the text had been proofread with a more critical eye, perhaps by a chemist: Rockets obtain power . . . by burning hydrogen and oxygen in a closed tank (p. 253); carbon-14 can be used to measure the thickness of objects such as sheets of steel; must the steel always be the same thickness? (p. 106); after properly defining spectra and spectrum on page 202, two lines later "spectra" is used where "spectrum" should be; "high speed" is correct: "high rate of speed" is not (p. 234-5). D. H. Stedman University of Denver


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