Cover image for Enterprise application integration with CORBA : component and Web-based solutions
Title:
Enterprise application integration with CORBA : component and Web-based solutions
Author:
Zahavi, Ron.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : Wiley, [2000]

©2000
Physical Description:
lxi, 496 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
General Note:
"Wiley computer publishing."

"OMG Press"--Cover.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780471327202
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library QA76.76.A65 Z34 2000 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
Searching...

On Order

Summary

Summary

"This book...gives EAI architects and developers the opportunity to learn directly from the authority on distributed computing, EAI, and CORBA." -David S. Linthicum Chief Technology Officer, SAGA Software, Inc.

In this book a CORBA pioneer provides proven, cost-effective techniques for integrating enterprise applications (including legacy applications) into modern, multiplatform systems. He also offers valuable advice and guidance on how to build new CORBA-based applications using the latest features of CORBA 3 . With the help of numerous case studies and examples, he provides detailed solutions for specific integration problems along with step-by-step guidance on:
* Using CORBA as the infrastructure for EAI
* Architecture principles for integrating the Web and back-end systems
* CORBA Component Model for component-based development
* Relationship of CORBA components to DCOM, JavaBeans, and Enterprise JavaBeans
* Using the essential CORBA services
* Object wrapping techniques for integrating legacy applications into multi-platform systems
* Building secure, multiplatform Web applications
On the companion Web site at www.wiley.com/compbooks/zahavi/ you'll find:
* Articles on related topics
* Continually maintained ORB and integration server, vendor, and product comparisons
* A dynamic discussion group on architectural best practices


Author Notes

Ron Zahavi is Vice President of the EAI Frameworks Solutions practice at Concept Five Technologies, Inc. This group of integration technology experts and architects supports the development of online solutions using distributed objects, messaging, Java, and the Web. He is currently serving on the OMG Architecture Board.


Table of Contents

Forewordp. xxi
Prefacep. xxv
Acknowledgmentsp. xxvii
About the Contributorsp. xxix
Introductionp. xxxi
The State of CORBAp. xxxiv
Distributed Object Integration: The Early Daysp. xxxvi
An Early User View of CORBAp. xxxvii
Custom versus Horizontal Frameworksp. xxxix
Guidelines for Migrationp. xli
Distributed Object Technologies Todayp. xliii
The User, Integrator, and Vendor Viewsp. xliii
Technology Confusionp. xlvii
Building Systems Using Services and Componentsp. xlviii
The Role of Integrationp. l
The Role of Architecturep. liii
Enterprise Architecture and Integrationp. liv
Deploying an Object-Based Web Systemp. lv
How This Book Is Organizedp. lvii
Who Should Read This Bookp. lix
Tools You Will Needp. lx
What's on the Web Sitep. lx
Summaryp. lxi
Part 1 Integration Fundamentalsp. 1
Chapter 1 Systems and Application Integrationp. 5
Navigating the Landscapep. 6
What Is Needed to Get Started?p. 6
What Is the Desired Solution?p. 11
Architectural Choicesp. 12
Two-Tier Client/Server Accessp. 12
Three-Tier Client/Server Accessp. 13
Distributed Object Infrastructurep. 13
Direct Legacy-to-Web Screen Accessp. 15
Direct Database-to-Web Accessp. 15
Custom Development Application Serversp. 16
Types of Integrationp. 17
Systems Integrationp. 19
Network Integrationp. 19
Application Integrationp. 20
Information Integrationp. 23
Enterprise Application Integrationp. 25
Integration Includes Both Environment and Processp. 25
The Integration Environmentp. 26
The Integration Processp. 34
Project Structurep. 40
Skillsp. 41
Team Structurep. 42
Run-Ahead Teamsp. 43
Summaryp. 44
Chapter 2 Architecting an Integrated Systemp. 45
Types of Architecturep. 46
Thin Clients versus Thick Clients, Thin Apps versus Thick Appsp. 53
Two-Tier Architecturesp. 55
Three-Tier Architecturesp. 56
N-Tier Architecturesp. 57
Related Architectural Frameworksp. 59
Object Management Architecturep. 59
Windows Distributed interNet Architecture (DNA)p. 60
The Open Group Architectural Frameworkp. 61
RM-ODPp. 63
Technical Architecture Framework for Information Management (TAFIM)p. 65
Which Architecture Is Right for You?p. 66
Custom and Vertical Architectures versus Generic Architecturesp. 67
Service-Oriented versus Instance-Oriented Architecturesp. 68
Methods for Cross-Technology Interworkingp. 69
Message-Based Systemsp. 71
Protecting Your Architecture from Platform and Vendor Dependenciesp. 71
Platform Dependenciesp. 72
Vendor Dependenciesp. 72
Isolation Layersp. 73
Common Development Frameworksp. 74
An Interceptor-Based Approachp. 75
Summaryp. 76
Chapter 3 Architecture Design Principlesp. 77
Architectural Foundationp. 78
Layering and Abstractionp. 78
Reusep. 78
Interoperabilityp. 79
Frameworks and Patternsp. 79
Assumptionsp. 80
Basic Featuresp. 80
Securityp. 80
Persistencep. 81
Life Cyclep. 81
Naming Strategyp. 82
Object Identityp. 83
Eventsp. 84
Advanced Featuresp. 84
Metadatap. 84
Data Formatsp. 85
Batch versus Transactionsp. 86
Internationalizationp. 86
Managementp. 87
Maintainabilityp. 87
Versioningp. 88
Debugability and Testabilityp. 88
Configurationp. 89
Robustnessp. 89
Scalabilityp. 89
Reliabilityp. 90
Availabilityp. 90
Fault Tolerancep. 91
Restart and Recoveryp. 91
Performancep. 92
Throughputp. 92
Multithreadingp. 92
Dispatching and Load Balancingp. 93
Caching/Smart Proxiesp. 94
Component Relationshipsp. 94
Interfacesp. 94
User Interfacesp. 95
Inheritance and Aggregationp. 95
Sequencing and Controlp. 96
Timep. 96
External Factorsp. 97
Standardsp. 97
Protocolsp. 98
Connectivityp. 98
COTSp. 98
External Constraintsp. 99
Organizational Constraintsp. 99
Summaryp. 99
Part 2 Integration Technologies for the Enterprisep. 101
Chapter 4 Applying the OMAp. 105
How the OMA Relates to Your Systemp. 106
CORBA as the Solution across Heterogeneous Platformsp. 110
CORBA as the Solution for Back-End Enterprise Legacy Integrationp. 111
CORBA as the Solution to Multitier Integrationp. 112
Using CORBAservices and CORBAfacilitiesp. 114
CORBAservicesp. 115
Which Service Is for You?p. 115
Other Key Platform Standardsp. 117
What's New with CORBA 3p. 119
Distributed Componentsp. 120
Java and Internet Integrationp. 122
Quality of Servicep. 123
Domain Facilitiesp. 126
CORBAmedp. 127
Telecommunication Domain Task Forcep. 128
Financial Domain Task Forcep. 128
Manufacturing Domain Task Forcep. 129
Electronic Commerce Task Forcep. 130
Life Sciences Research Domain Task Forcep. 130
Business Objects and the Business Objects Initiativep. 130
Special Interest Groupsp. 131
C4I DSIGp. 131
Internet PSIGp. 131
Security SIGp. 131
Eai Special Interest Groupp. 132
Summaryp. 132
Chapter 5 Essential CORBA Services: Part Onep. 133
Object Naming Servicep. 134
Backgroundp. 134
Status, Market Support, and Availabilityp. 135
Using the Naming Servicep. 135
Architectural Issuesp. 139
Relationship to Other Standardsp. 143
Trading Servicep. 144
Backgroundp. 145
Status, Market Support, and Availabilityp. 145
Using the Trading Servicep. 145
Architectural Issuesp. 152
Relationship to Other Standardsp. 153
Event Service and Notificationp. 153
Backgroundp. 154
Status, Market Support, and Availabilityp. 155
Using Events and Notificationp. 156
Relationship to Other Standardsp. 161
Persistencep. 161
Backgroundp. 161
Status, Market Support, and Availabilityp. 163
Using Persistencep. 164
Relationship to Other Standardsp. 168
Transaction Servicep. 170
Backgroundp. 170
Status, Market Support, and Availabilityp. 171
Using the Object Transaction Servicep. 173
Architectural Issuesp. 177
Nested Transactionsp. 179
Interoperabilityp. 179
Relationship to Other Standardsp. 180
Summaryp. 182
Chapter 6 Essential CORBA Services: Part Twop. 183
Lifecyclep. 183
Backgroundp. 184
Status, Market Support, and Availabilityp. 185
Using the Lifecycle Servicep. 185
Relationship to Other Standardsp. 189
Externalizationp. 190
Backgroundp. 190
Status, Market Support, and Availabilityp. 191
Using the Externalization Servicep. 191
Architectural Issuesp. 195
Relationship to Other Standardsp. 196
Systems Managementp. 197
Backgroundp. 197
Status, Market Support, and Availabilityp. 198
Usage and Architectural Issuesp. 198
Relationship to Other Servicesp. 203
Relationshipp. 204
Backgroundp. 204
Status, Market Support, and Availabilityp. 206
The Mechanics of Object Relationshipsp. 207
Architectural Issuesp. 208
Relationship to Other Servicesp. 210
Frameworks for Ease of Usep. 211
Keeping It Simple with a Service Access Layerp. 211
Portabilityp. 214
Case Study: EBOFp. 215
Current OMG Workp. 219
Conclusionsp. 219
Summaryp. 220
Chapter 7 Implementing a CORBA-Based Web Architecturep. 221
Benefits of Web Deliveryp. 222
Understanding Internet Standards and Technologiesp. 222
First-Generation Technologiesp. 225
Universal Resource Identifierp. 226
HyperText Transfer Protocolp. 227
Multipurpose Internet Mail Extensionsp. 228
Common Gateway Interfacep. 228
HyperText Markup Languagep. 229
First-Generation Architecturesp. 230
Second-Generation Technologiesp. 234
Discoveryp. 234
Interactivityp. 235
Standard Content Extensionp. 236
Scripting Languagesp. 243
Performance Enhancementsp. 244
Legacy Systems Integrationp. 246
Second-Generation Architecturesp. 247
The Next Generation of Object Webp. 250
eXtensible Markup Languagep. 251
Document Object Modelp. 254
Resource Description Frameworkp. 255
HTTP Next Generationp. 257
Highly Networked Small Devicesp. 258
Next-Generation Architecturesp. 259
Related Standards Bodiesp. 260
Internet Engineering Task Forcep. 260
World Wide Web Consortiump. 261
OMG's Internet Platform SIGp. 261
Sun Microsystems' JavaSoft Divisionp. 261
Case Study: A Simple Web/CORBA Gatewayp. 262
Solution/Architecturep. 263
Architectural Issuesp. 264
Conclusionp. 264
Case Study: Distributed Object Systems at CNN Interactivep. 265
Software Development Needsp. 265
Software Development Goalsp. 266
The Distributed Publishing Architecturep. 267
CORBA-Based Services on the CNN Web Sitep. 271
Case Study Summaryp. 273
Summaryp. 273
Chapter 8 Integrating the Enterprise with Distributed Object Componentsp. 275
What Is a Component?p. 276
Front-End and Back-End Componentsp. 277
Component Capabilitiesp. 277
Introspectionp. 277
Propertiesp. 278
Eventsp. 279
Scriptingp. 280
Support for Complex Interactionsp. 281
Which Component Technology Is Right for You?p. 282
JavaBeans and Infobusp. 283
Enterprise JavaBeansp. 285
COM, DCOM, and ActiveXp. 286
COM+p. 288
CORBA and CORBAcomponentsp. 289
Component Architecture Choicesp. 292
Picking a Modelp. 296
Component Protocol Interoperabilityp. 299
Case Study: An Architectural Approach to Integration across Component Modelsp. 305
Backgroundp. 305
Architecturep. 307
Issuesp. 308
Case Study Summaryp. 310
Summaryp. 310
Chapter 9 Securing the Enterprisep. 313
Enterprise Security Needsp. 314
Internet versus Intranets and Extranetsp. 315
Key Security Goalsp. 318
Basic Security Requirementsp. 318
Taking an Enterprisewide Viewp. 319
Risk Managementp. 321
Distributed Systems and Distributed Securityp. 323
Distributed Systems Security Technologiesp. 327
CORBA Security for the Infrastructurep. 330
OMG CORBA Security Service Specificationp. 330
CORBA Security Conceptsp. 332
Levels of Security Servicep. 333
CORBA Security Integration Configurationp. 334
Defining CORBA Security Policiesp. 336
CORBA Security Functionsp. 340
Case Study: Building CORBA Securityp. 348
Security Policy Domainsp. 348
CORBA Security Interoperability Approachp. 349
Case Study Summaryp. 350
Summaryp. 353
Part 3 Integration in Practicep. 355
Chapter 10 Integrating the Legacyp. 357
Legacy Integration Approachesp. 358
Rehostingp. 358
Rewritingp. 358
Reusingp. 359
Methods of Wrappingp. 359
Custom Interfaces, Custom Data Typesp. 361
Generic Interfaces, Generic Data Typesp. 362
Custom Interfaces, Generic Data Typesp. 363
Generic Interfaces, Custom Data Typesp. 364
Wrapping the Mainframep. 365
Mainframe Integration Approachesp. 366
How CORBA and Distributed Objects Fit Inp. 367
Architectural Approachp. 368
Batch/File-Oriented Legacy Access Approachp. 369
Interactive Legacy Access Approachp. 373
Dealing with Data Conversionp. 375
Securityp. 378
Component Reusep. 379
Enterprise Needs and Messagingp. 379
Message-Oriented Middlewarep. 380
ORB/Messaging Interoperabilityp. 382
Vendor Approaches to Legacy Integrationp. 385
Application Serversp. 385
Message Brokersp. 388
Packaged Applicationsp. 389
EAI Integration Serversp. 389
Case Study: Legacy Integration Framework Evolutionp. 390
DISCUSp. 391
Applying the Concepts to an Engineering Environmentp. 396
Evolution into a Commercial Capabilityp. 397
The Relationship to EAIp. 400
Summaryp. 401
Chapter 11 EAI and CORBA: Lessons Learnedp. 403
Single View of the Customerp. 404
Approaches to Integrationp. 404
What and How Much to Distributep. 405
Operations versus Attributesp. 406
Number of Objects and Their Interactionsp. 406
Passing Data versus Object Referencesp. 407
Generic versus Custom Interfacesp. 408
Interoperabilityp. 418
Namingp. 419
The Need for Semantic Informationp. 420
Transactionsp. 427
Security Interoperabilityp. 431
Selecting a Client-Side Technologyp. 438
CORBA: Performance, Complexity, and Scalabilityp. 439
Performance Issuesp. 439
Making CORBA Simplerp. 442
Scalability and Robustnessp. 445
CORBA Is Evolving Successfullyp. 446
EAI and Organizational Realitiesp. 447
Organizational Politics Impact on Architecturep. 447
How to Get Buy-Inp. 449
Ensuring ROIp. 450
Impact of the Webp. 451
Impact of Standardsp. 452
Don't Forget the Customerp. 452
Case Study: Data Object Manager at a Bankp. 453
Backgroundp. 453
Architecture of the Solutionp. 454
Technical Issuesp. 456
Lessons Learnedp. 456
Case Study Summaryp. 457
CORBA and EAI: The Final Wordp. 457
Appendix A Referencesp. 461
Additional Referencesp. 466
Appendix B Glossary of Acronymsp. 467
Indexp. 477

Google Preview