Cover image for Barefoot heart : stories of a migrant child
Title:
Barefoot heart : stories of a migrant child
Author:
Hart, Elva Treviño, 1949-
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Tempe, Ariz. : Bilingual Press/Editorial Bilingüe, [1999]

©1999
Physical Description:
236 pages ; 22 cm
Language:
English
Reading Level:
770 Lexile.
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR UG 5.7 13.0 35027.

Reading Counts RC High School 6.4 20 Quiz: 28406 Guided reading level: NR.
Personal Subject:
ISBN:
9780927534819
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library E184.M5 H365 1999 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area
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Lake Shore Library E184.M5 H365 1999 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Anna M. Reinstein Library E184.M5 H365 1999 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Summary

Summary

Autobiography. Latino/a Studies. BAREFOOT HEART is a vividly told autobiographical account of the life of a child growing up in a family of migrant farm workers. Elva Trevino Hart was born in south Texas to Mexican immigrants and spent her childhood moving back and forth between Texas and Minnesota, eventually leaving that world to earn a master's degree in computer science/engineering. This is a beautiful book, one many of us teaching Laino/a memoir and autobiography have long been waiting for. It is here at last, dear reader, in your hands. To be read and reread, savored to the last word. I extend a heartfelt welcome to the author and her beautiful book - Virgil Suarez, author of HAVANA THURSDAYS.


Reviews 2

Publisher's Weekly Review

Hart's expressive and remarkably affecting memoir concerns her childhood as the daughter of Mexican immigrants who worked as migrant workers to feed their six children. In 1953, when she was only three, her parents took the family from Texas to work in the fields of Minnesota and Wisconsin for the first time, only to find that in order to comply with the child labor law they had to leave the author and her 11-year-old sister to board in a local Catholic school, where they pined for the rest of the family. Hart remembers other years when the entire family participated in the backbreaking field labor, driven mercilessly by Apa (her father), who was determined to earn enough money to allow all his children to graduate from high school. Apa not only achieved his goal but was able to save $2000 so that Hart could enter college, a step that led to her earning a master's degree in computer science. This account is not, however, an ordinary memoir of triumph over adversity. Instead, Hart eloquently reveals the harsh toll that poverty and discrimination took on her familyÄin sharply etched portraits of Ama, Hart's worn-out mother who clearly loved her daughter but was too exhausted to show it; of her brother Rudy, who refused to sit at the back of the bus because he was a Mexican; and of her teenage sisters, who struggled to keep their dignity in the muddy fields. She recalls many painful incidents in school and with childhood friends that stemmed from being Mexican in a small white Texas town. At 17, she drove her father back to Mexico to visit his family; she recalls how he suddenly changed into a happy man who felt at home with his land, his language and his people. This is a beautifully written debut from a writer to watch. (June) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


Library Journal Review

Both books are well written and help the reader understand the faces behind the statistics. Barefoot Heart is more lyrical, reading like a novel, and is appropriate for junior high through adult readers and even book groups. A Dream for Gilberto is more of a case study and will be appreciated by slightly older readers as well as teachers and other professionals working with the Latino population. Both are recommended for public libraries.ÄDeborah Bigelow, Leonia P.L., NJ (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


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