Cover image for Nationalism
Title:
Nationalism
Author:
Calhoun, Craig J., 1952-
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Minneapolis : University of Minnesota Press, [1997]

©1997
Physical Description:
x, 164 pages ; 23 cm.
Language:
English
Subject Term:
ISBN:
9780816631209

9780816631216
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library JC311 .C28 1997 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Summary

Summary

Nationalism is one of the most pressing of global problems. Drawing on examples from around the world, Craig Calhoun considers nationalism's diverse manifestations, its history, and its relationship to imperialism and colonialism. He also challenges attempts to "debunk" nationalism that fail to grasp why it still has such power and centrality in modern life.


Summary

Nationalism is one of the most pressing of global problems. Drawing on examples from around the world, Craig Calhoun considers nationalism's diverse manifestations, its history, and its relationship to imperialism and colonialism. He also challenges attempts to "debunk" nationalism that fail to grasp why it still has such power and centrality in modern life.


Reviews 2

Choice Review

Part of the "Concepts in Social Thought" series, this is the latest of many recently published books on nationalism. Aside from a few digressions, e.g., on mapmaking, Calhoun, professor of sociology at New York University and the University of Oslo, focuses on the rhetoric of national identity formation. His approach is more sociological than historical or political as compared to, for example, Anthony D. Smith's Nationalism in the Twentieth Century (1979) or Peter Alter's excellent Nationalism (1989), respectively. Calhoun strikes a balance between a consideration of ways in which national consciousness has served as a source of solidarity and of conflict and concludes that nationalism will continue to be a powerful influence in contemporary societies. Some of his more interesting observations appear in the endnotes, together with highlights of various intellectual debates over nationalism. These and the over 200-entry bibliography make the book a valuable resource for those wanting to explore the subject further. It can be most strongly recommended as a text for upper level undergraduates. R. P. Peters; University of Massachusetts at Boston


Choice Review

Part of the "Concepts in Social Thought" series, this is the latest of many recently published books on nationalism. Aside from a few digressions, e.g., on mapmaking, Calhoun, professor of sociology at New York University and the University of Oslo, focuses on the rhetoric of national identity formation. His approach is more sociological than historical or political as compared to, for example, Anthony D. Smith's Nationalism in the Twentieth Century (1979) or Peter Alter's excellent Nationalism (1989), respectively. Calhoun strikes a balance between a consideration of ways in which national consciousness has served as a source of solidarity and of conflict and concludes that nationalism will continue to be a powerful influence in contemporary societies. Some of his more interesting observations appear in the endnotes, together with highlights of various intellectual debates over nationalism. These and the over 200-entry bibliography make the book a valuable resource for those wanting to explore the subject further. It can be most strongly recommended as a text for upper level undergraduates. R. P. Peters; University of Massachusetts at Boston


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