Cover image for Reconstruction
Title:
Reconstruction
Author:
January, Brendan, 1972-
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : Children's Press, [1999]

©1999
Physical Description:
30 pages : illustrations (some color), maps ; 25 cm.
Summary:
A history of Reconstruction, the period after the Civil War during which programs were implemented to bring the Confederate States back to the Union.
General Note:
Includes index.
Language:
English
Program Information:
Reading Counts RC 3-5 6.1 3 Quiz: 23207 Guided reading level: T.
ISBN:
9780516211435

9780516264615
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
East Aurora Library E668 .J38 1999 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Grand Island Library E668 .J38 1999 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Hamburg Library E668 .J38 1999 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Orchard Park Library E668 .J38 1999 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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On Order

Summary

Summary

Dramatic and defining moments in American history come vividly the life in the Cornerstones of Freedom series.


Reviews 1

Booklist Review

Gr. 4^-6. These two titles in the Cornerstones of Freedom series focus on crucial events in American history. The design is attractive, with clear type, photographs or prints on every page (some in color), a time line, and a glossary. The narratives set the events in context and combine the facts with commentary that is fair and open. The account of Reconstruction gives details of the fight in Congress for constitutional change and also describes the personal suffering of the freed blacks whose dreams of farming their own land were shattered. Connect this with Robinet's novel Forty Acres and Maybe a Mule (1998), which humanizes this history. The account of the Panama Canal discusses the political struggle for control by the U.S., the facts of construction, and also the blatant discrimination against Panamanians in pay, working conditions, and access. This title will be of special interest because the U.S. is giving up the canal; finally, at the end of 1999, Panama will no longer be divided or controlled by another country. Two more titles in the series are listed in the Series Roundup in this issue. --Hazel Rochman


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