Cover image for Imagining women : Fujian folk tales
Title:
Imagining women : Fujian folk tales
Author:
Gernant, Karen.
Publication Information:
New York : Interlink Books, 1995.
Physical Description:
viii, 276 pages : illustrations ; 22 cm
Language:
English
Added Author:
ISBN:
9781566561730

9781566561747
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library GR336.F8 I43 1995 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Summary

Summary

Rich in cultural significance, each title in this bestselling series includes a collection of 20 to 30 tales together with an introduction and a historical overview that give the reader compelling insights into the culture, the folk literature, and the lives of the people in the region.


Summary

For centuries, the voices of ordinary folk in China were muted by the male-dominant Confucian culture and remained largely hidden from outsiders. This is a study of Chinese folktales by ordinary people, especially by women.


Reviews 2

Choice Review

This collection of Chinese folk tales from Fujian province is rich in variety. The explanatory endnotes are generally helpful. The analytical introduction and headnotes, however, in which Gernant (history, Southern Oregon State Univ.) imposes on the collection the unifying theme "imagining women," are less successful. Her assertion that these folk narratives constitute a resistance to, or alternate set of values from, classic Chinese Confucianism has merit; however, limiting the analysis of the tales to the role of the "heroines" oversimplifies and distorts their themes and motifs. Although the historical background of Fujian provides helpful contextualization of the tales, Gernant disregards such important elements as the specifically Buddhist or Taoist nature of some narratives, the appearance of Indo-European m"archen motifs, the centrality of the Chinese judicial system in certain plots, and the general character of folk literature, which praises personal characteristics of courtesy and kindness over riches and status. Recommended for general libraries desiring a comprehensive collection of folk narrative or Chinese literature. The translation appears to be quite literal, so the anthology may also be considered a primary source for researchers. J. Gregg; CUNY, New York City Technical College


Choice Review

This collection of Chinese folk tales from Fujian province is rich in variety. The explanatory endnotes are generally helpful. The analytical introduction and headnotes, however, in which Gernant (history, Southern Oregon State Univ.) imposes on the collection the unifying theme "imagining women," are less successful. Her assertion that these folk narratives constitute a resistance to, or alternate set of values from, classic Chinese Confucianism has merit; however, limiting the analysis of the tales to the role of the "heroines" oversimplifies and distorts their themes and motifs. Although the historical background of Fujian provides helpful contextualization of the tales, Gernant disregards such important elements as the specifically Buddhist or Taoist nature of some narratives, the appearance of Indo-European m"archen motifs, the centrality of the Chinese judicial system in certain plots, and the general character of folk literature, which praises personal characteristics of courtesy and kindness over riches and status. Recommended for general libraries desiring a comprehensive collection of folk narrative or Chinese literature. The translation appears to be quite literal, so the anthology may also be considered a primary source for researchers. J. Gregg; CUNY, New York City Technical College


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