Cover image for The demon slayers and other stories : Bengali folk tales
Title:
The demon slayers and other stories : Bengali folk tales
Author:
DasGupta, Sayantani.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : Interlink Books, 1995.
Physical Description:
viii, 167 pages ; 22 cm
Language:
English
Added Author:
ISBN:
9781566561648

9781566561563
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library GR305.5.B4 D27 1995 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Summary

Summary

The 20 tales and nine poems in this anthology give the reader a fascinating insight into the oral literature and rich culture of Bengal, the region now comprising of West Bengal in India, and Bangladesh.


Summary

A collection of Bengali folk tales. Among the stories of princes, devata (deities) and bloodthirsty rashash (demons), stories of women's lives and images emerge. Women and their goddeses bring to life not only the nurturing Bengali motherland itself, but demons as well.


Reviews 2

Choice Review

The 20 tales and nine poems in this anthology are collected under five headings: marriage and adventure, family unity, cunning, greed and piety, and the supernatural. Clearly this arrangement is rather arbitrary; another editor might well have seen a connection between marriage and family, piety and the supernatural, and greed and cunning. Yet the tales themselves are interesting, admonitory, and illustrative of generations-old mores and roles--especially women's roles. However, the long and interesting introduction is markedly partial to Hindu interests (and those clearly Brahman) and not relevant to the tales themselves. We are told, for example, that the Raj "brought Bengali society to its nadir," and that "during this time child marriage, hypergamy, sati ... the cult of Thagi (ritualistic highway robbery and murder) and human sacrifice proliferated." Clearly this interpretation of history is at odds with the facts, as is the assertion that Bengali Hindus were responsible for all the social reforms in India and even for "securing Indian freedom in 1947." Even other Indians would question the statement that in Bengal there is noteworthy veneration for the mother--both mortal and divine. General audiences. A. L. McLeod Rider University


Choice Review

The 20 tales and nine poems in this anthology are collected under five headings: marriage and adventure, family unity, cunning, greed and piety, and the supernatural. Clearly this arrangement is rather arbitrary; another editor might well have seen a connection between marriage and family, piety and the supernatural, and greed and cunning. Yet the tales themselves are interesting, admonitory, and illustrative of generations-old mores and roles--especially women's roles. However, the long and interesting introduction is markedly partial to Hindu interests (and those clearly Brahman) and not relevant to the tales themselves. We are told, for example, that the Raj "brought Bengali society to its nadir," and that "during this time child marriage, hypergamy, sati ... the cult of Thagi (ritualistic highway robbery and murder) and human sacrifice proliferated." Clearly this interpretation of history is at odds with the facts, as is the assertion that Bengali Hindus were responsible for all the social reforms in India and even for "securing Indian freedom in 1947." Even other Indians would question the statement that in Bengal there is noteworthy veneration for the mother--both mortal and divine. General audiences. A. L. McLeod Rider University


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