Cover image for A history of Slovak literature
Title:
A history of Slovak literature
Author:
Petro, Peter.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Montréal ; Buffalo : McGill-Queen's University Press, [1995]

©1995
Physical Description:
x, 164 pages ; 24 cm
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780773513112

9780773514027
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library PG5401 .P48 1995 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Summary

Summary

In spite of its richness and long history, Slovak literature is one of the least-known Slavic literatures in the English-speaking world. Few translations of Slovak works exist and until now there has been no systematic English-language history of the field. A History of Slovak Literature provides an excellent introduction to this important but overlooked body of writing.

Starting with the Great Moravian period, Peter Petro surveys one thousand years of Slovak literature. He examines the medieval, Renaissance, baroque, classical, romantic, realist, and modern periods and highlights the contributions of such writers as Hronsky, Hviezdoslav, Kollar, Kukucin, Nedozersky, Papanek, Rufus, Safarik, Tatarka, Tranovsky, Vajansky, and Zaborsky.


Summary

Starting with the Great Moravian period, Peter Petro surveys one thousand years of Slovak literature. He examines the medieval, Renaissance, baroque, classical, romantic, realist, and modern periods and highlights the contributions of such writers as Hronsk#65533;, Hviezdoslav, Koll#65533;r, Kukuc#65533;n, Nedozersk#65533;, Pap#65533;nek, R#65533;fus, Saf#65533;rik, Tatarka, Tranovsk#65533;, Vajansk#65533;, and Z#65533;borsk#65533;. Like Czech, Polish, and Ukrainian writing, Slovak literature transcended the merely literary to become an influential political and cultural tool: Slovak writers and poets played an important role in promoting and protecting the culture and language of their people against invading cultures. A History of Slovak Literature will be a welcome addition to the field of Slavic studies.


Reviews 2

Choice Review

Petro (Univ. of British Columbia) provides a detailed introduction to the thousand-year history of Slovak literature. Beginning with the mission of Cyril and Methodius to the Great Moravian Empire in the 9th century CE, the book analyzes each successive literary trend in light of the region's complex political and sociolinguistic development. Along with translations of short passages from key works, many appearing in English for the first time, the author provides a wealth of detail about each writer's life and aspirations. No significant Slovak writer or literary event escapes mention in this highly readable narrative. A few other books in English provide information about select aspects in Slovak literature, notably Norma Rudinsky's Incipient Feminists: Women Writers in the Slovak National Revival (1991), An Anthology of Slovak Poetry, ed. by I. Kramoris (1947), and Modern Slovak Prose: Fiction Since 1954, ed. by R. Pynsent (1990). The present title acquaints English readers for the first time with the full richness of a creative tradition that Petro aptly terms the "perennial Cinderella of central European literature." All collections. E. J. Vajda Western Washington University


Choice Review

Petro (Univ. of British Columbia) provides a detailed introduction to the thousand-year history of Slovak literature. Beginning with the mission of Cyril and Methodius to the Great Moravian Empire in the 9th century CE, the book analyzes each successive literary trend in light of the region's complex political and sociolinguistic development. Along with translations of short passages from key works, many appearing in English for the first time, the author provides a wealth of detail about each writer's life and aspirations. No significant Slovak writer or literary event escapes mention in this highly readable narrative. A few other books in English provide information about select aspects in Slovak literature, notably Norma Rudinsky's Incipient Feminists: Women Writers in the Slovak National Revival (1991), An Anthology of Slovak Poetry, ed. by I. Kramoris (1947), and Modern Slovak Prose: Fiction Since 1954, ed. by R. Pynsent (1990). The present title acquaints English readers for the first time with the full richness of a creative tradition that Petro aptly terms the "perennial Cinderella of central European literature." All collections. E. J. Vajda Western Washington University


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