Cover image for The ugly duckling
Title:
The ugly duckling
Author:
Pinkney, Jerry.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : Morrow Junior Books, [1999]

©1999
Physical Description:
1 volume (unpaged) : color illustrations ; 29 cm
Summary:
An ugly duckling spends an unhappy year ostracized by the other animals before he grows into a beautiful swan.
General Note:
"Originally published as Fairy Tales from Hans Andersen"--verso t.p.
Language:
English
Reading Level:
AD 650 Lexile.
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR LG 4.5 0.5 35269.

Reading Counts RC K-2 3.1 2 Quiz: 19707 Guided reading level: J.
Genre:
ISBN:
9780688159320

9780688159337
Format :
Book

Available:*

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Central Library PZ8.P575 UG 1999 Juvenile Non-Fiction Childrens Area
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On Order

Summary

Summary

A gorgeous, Caldecott Honor-winning version of the classic story

For over one hundred years The Ugly Duckling has been a childhood favorite, and Jerry Pinkney's spectacular adaptation brings it triumphantly to new generations of readers.

With keen emotion and fresh vision, the acclaimed artist captures the essence of the tale's timeless appeal: The journey of the awkward little bird--marching bravely through hecklers, hunters, and cruel seasons--is an unforgettable survival story; this blooming into a graceful swan is a reminder of the patience often necessary to discover true happiness. Splendid watercolors set in the lush countryside bring the drama to life in this hardcover picture book.


Author Notes

Jerry Pinkney was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania on December 22, 1939. He began drawing as a four-year-old child, studied commercial art at the Dobbins Vocational School, and received a full scholarship to the Philadelphia Museum College of Art. After graduating, Pinkney worked in design and illustrations, helped found Kaleidoscope Studios, and later opened the Jerry Pinkney Studio.

His is a children's book illustrator and has created the art for over one hundred titles including Julius Lester's John Henry, Sam and the Tigers, and The Old African, plus adaptations of Hans Christian Andersen's The Little Match Girl and The Nightingale. He has won numerous awards including six Caldecott Honor Medals, five Coretta Scott King Awards, four Coretta Scott King Honor Awards, four New York Times Best Illustrated Book awards, and the Hamilton King Award. He also received the Virginia Hamilton Literary award from Kent State University in 2000, the University of Southern Mississippi Medallion in 2004, the Original Art's Lifetime Achievement Award from the Society of Illustrators in 2006, Laura Ingalls Wilder Award in 2016, and the Coretta Scott King -Virginia Hamilton Award for Lifetime Achievement in 2016.

In addition to holding numerous one-man retrospectives and exhibiting his work in more than one hundred international group shows, Pinkney's art resides in the permanent collections of the Library of Congress, the New York Public Library, the Delaware Art Museum, and the Brandywine River Art Museum. He has taught art at the Pratt Institute, the University of Delaware, and the University of Buffalo.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

Ages 4^-8. Like his illustrations for Patricia McKissack's Mirandy and Brother Wind (1989), Pinkney's joyful watercolors set his adaptation of Hans Christian Andersen's classic story in an old-fashioned pastoral world. The gorgeous double-page spreads combine realistic light-filled scenes of farmyard and pond life with a focus on one small bird who doesn't fit in, an awkward creature who appears to disrupt the natural harmony but is really part of the wonder of connection and renewal. Andersen's story has inspired outsiders for more than 150 years, and Pinkney tells it here with stirring drama. From the moment the bird hatches out of the egg, he is "a monstrous big duckling," pecked by the other birds, taunted even by his brothers and sisters, kicked by the girl who feeds him. He steals away to a marshy place, escapes hunters and their dogs, can't fit in with kindly humans and their pets. Watching a beautiful flock of swans flying south, he yearns to fly high with them; instead, he endures cold and hunger and cruelty through the long winter. A heartrending picture shows him caught fast in the ice, alone, in a still, desolate landscape. In glorious contrast is the climactic scene in spring when he flies to join the swans in the water, looks down to see his reflection, and finds not dull feathers and an awkward skinny neck but a bird of regal beauty. The final picture of the great swan in the water with blooming flowers, leaping fish, and a hovering dragonfly, is a triumph of delicacy and strength, harmony and grace. --Hazel Rochman


Publisher's Weekly Review

Pinkney's (Rikki-Tikki-Tavi) supple, exquisitely detailed watercolors provide a handsome foil to his graceful adaptation of the Hans Christian Andersen classic. This "duckling" is teased unmercifully by his apparent siblings but loved by the mother duck: "He may not be quite as handsome as the others," she says, "but... I am sure he will make his way in the world as well as anybody." Eventually he runs away, and as the seasons turn, the fledgling has a series of adventures, from a close encounter with a hunting dog to getting trapped in ice. All the while he is growing, transforming, and in the triumphant ending, he finds peace and happiness when his real identity is revealed to himself and to readers. Pinkney's artwork is a swan song to the beauty of the pastoral, and his lush images flow across the pages in sweeping vistas and meticulous close-ups. Whether depicting the subtle patterns and colors of a duck's feathers, the murky twilight of a freshwater pond or the contrast of red berries against dried grasses etched with snow, Pinkney's keenly observed watercolors honor nature in all its splendor. A flawlessly nuanced performance by a consummate craftsman. Ages 3-up. (Mar.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

K-Gr 4-The appeal of this tale is as strong today as it was 150 years ago, and Pinkney has done an admirable job of repackaging it for a new generation. His adaptation of the text succeeds in capturing the gentleness and melancholy of Andersen, although a bit of the social commentary has gone by the wayside. Pinkney does not shy away from including the more disturbing elements, such as the shooting of the geese, recognizing this episode's importance to the fabric of the story. The first glimpse he gives readers of the duckling, having at long last emerged from his shell, exhausted and vulnerable despite his size, foreshadows the events to come and immediately engages children's sympathy. Naturalists will quibble over the artist's choice of birds. This duckling is born into a mallard family, wild, not domestic, and the geese are Canadas, whose range is generally North America. However, these details do not in any way detract from the feast to the eye that these illustrations are, carefully composed and rich in detail. Even those owning The Ugly Duckling as told by Marianna Mayer, illustrated by Thomas Locker (Macmillan, 1987; o.p.)-the most recent "Duckling" of note-will welcome this fresh new version. An artistic tour de force that is worthy of its graceful fine-feathered subject.-Grace Oliff, Ann Blanche Smith School, Hillsdale, NJ (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


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