Cover image for King Midas : a golden tale
Title:
King Midas : a golden tale
Author:
Stewig, John W.
Personal Author:
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
New York : Holiday House, 1999.
Physical Description:
1 volume ; 28 cm
Summary:
A king finds himself bitterly regretting the consequences of his wish that everything he touches would turn to gold.
Language:
English
Reading Level:
AD 590 Lexile.
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR LG 4.6 0.5 29467.

Reading Counts RC K-2 4.9 2 Quiz: 23867 Guided reading level: O.
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780823414239
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library BL820.M55 S74 1999 Juvenile Non-Fiction Childrens Area
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Boston Free Library BL820.M55 S74 1999 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Clearfield Library BL820.M55 S74 1999 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Orchard Park Library BL820.M55 S74 1999 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Audubon Library BL820.M55 S74 1999 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Audubon Library BL820.M55 S74 1999 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Hamburg Library BL820.M55 S74 1999 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Summary

Summary

King Midas loves gold. Nothing can satisfy his desire for the precious metal, until a mysterious stranger offers him the gift of the Golden Touch. In this modern retelling of the familiar tale of greed and regret, Midas learns the hard way that some things in life are indeed more precious than gold.


Reviews 2

Booklist Review

Ages 5^-8, older for reading alone. In this jocose rendition of the classic story, the gold-greedy Phrygian king is seen in a cutaway palace liberally festooned with elaborate architectural details and creatures both natural and mythological. Delightedly accepting the gift of golden touch from a tall, curly horned stranger, Midas cavorts about his garden, changing all the roses, then discovers his error at breakfast (cereal--" Poseidon Puffs" --and coffee) when he inadvertently turns his beloved daughter Marygold into a statue. Happily, the stranger reappears, offering to take back the gift; the grief-stricken king jumps at the chance to bring Marygold back to life and goes on to a long, happy reign. Stewig makes the tale's point without hammering it in, and children will pore over the plethora of comic detail in Rayyan's swirling illustrations. --John Peters


School Library Journal Review

Gr 1-4-The story of Midas is a prescription we need filled regularly. This version, livelier in text as well as in its graphics than Charlotte and Kinuko Craft's King Midas (Morrow, 1999), takes off from Nathaniel Hawthorne's A Wonder Book, with its emphasis on the child Marygold. Stewig uses deft, direct language, moving at a faster pace than Craft without any sacrifice of significance. The real lure, however, is the artwork. Rayyan's imagination is playful and sophisticated. The delicately color-washed, light-struck paintings combine an expressionistic, almost cartoonish Midas, beautifully detailed architectural and other allusions to the antique, and a host of whimsically anachronistic touches. Dionysus/Pan is a Klimt-Beardsley hybrid, Midas eats "Plato Poseidon Puffs" for breakfast, and guest appearances by the Frog Prince and a host of mythological minor characters enliven every page. There's also a discreetly hidden plug for the artist's last book, The Ring of Truth (Holiday, 1997). Teasing details require study, but the time spent is repaid by the grace, intelligence, and wit of the artwork.-Patricia Lothrop-Green, St. George's School, Newport, RI (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


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