Cover image for The hatseller and the monkeys : A West African folktale
Title:
The hatseller and the monkeys : A West African folktale
Author:
Diakité, Baba Wagué.
Personal Author:
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
New York : Scholastic Press, [1999]

©1999
Physical Description:
1 volume (unpaged) : color illustrations ; 26 cm
Summary:
An African version of the familiar story of a man who sets off to sell his hats, only to have them stolen by a treeful of mischievous monkeys.
Language:
English
Reading Level:
AD 650 Lexile.
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR LG 4.1 0.5 44663.

Reading Counts RC K-2 3.5 2 Quiz: 19649 Guided reading level: N.
ISBN:
9780590960694
Format :
Book

Available:*

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Newstead Library PZ8.1.D564 HAT 1999 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Clarence Library PZ8.1.D564 HAT 1999 Juvenile Non-Fiction Fairy Tales
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Clearfield Library PZ8.1.D564 HAT 1999 Juvenile Non-Fiction Fairy Tales
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Elma Library PZ8.1.D564 HAT 1999 Juvenile Non-Fiction Fairy Tales
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Frank E. Merriweather Library PZ8.1.D564 HAT 1999 Juvenile Non-Fiction Fairy Tales
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Frank E. Merriweather Library PZ8.1.D564 HAT 1999 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Orchard Park Library PZ8.1.D564 HAT 1999 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Anna M. Reinstein Library PZ8.1.D564 HAT 1999 Juvenile Non-Fiction Fairy Tales
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Summary

Summary

One day, BaMusa sets out for a festival to sell his hats. But when he falls asleep under a mango tree, some mischievous monkeys take them...Charming storyline, cleverly executed theme, inviting illustrations, and unusual sound effects for read-aloud fun." - Kirkus Reviews, starred review. "Diakit#65533;'s use of language is as colorful and unusual as his artwork." - Publishers Weekly, starred review


Author Notes

Born in 1961 in Mali, West Africa, Baba Wagu#65533; Diakit#65533; was named "Wagu#65533;," or "Man of Trust," after his grandfather. "I grew up in a storytelling family," Diakit#65533; remembers. "Even after my Western education in a French school, my basic understanding of life is still from this traditional education of mankind that my grandparents taught me...Without stories, there is no art." Though always artistically inclined, he didn't begin the ceramic work for which he is known until after he moved to the U.S. in 1985. Diakit#65533;'s work has been in shows in New York, California, Texas, and Oregon. His first picture book, a retelling of one of his grandmother's fables called The Hunterman and the Crocodile, was named a Coretta Scott King Honor Book. Diakit#65533; teamed up with his daughter Penda, who was 12 at the time, to publish I Lost My Tooth in Africa, a warm family story about the African tooth fairy. Penda was inspired to write this story about her little sister after they returned from visiting their family in Mali. The Diakit#65533; family divides their time between Portland, Oregon, and Bamako, Mali. For more information about Baba Wagu#65533; Diakit#65533;, visit: scholastic.com/tradebooks


Reviews 2

Publisher's Weekly Review

Fans of Slobodkina's Caps for Sale will relish this fresh twist on a hat vendor's comical skirmish with some clever primates, set in Diakité's (The Hunterman and the Crocodile) native Mali. BaMusa is not only a hatseller, but descends from a long line of hatmakers. After a brief explanation of how he learned to make wide-brimmed dibiri hats and close-fitting fugulan caps, he heads to town to sell them. He stops to nap under a mango tree, where some monkeys relieve him of his hats. The author makes the most of the interplay between the mischievous culprits and BaMusa with phrases children will want to imitate right along with the characters ("Tchat, tchat, tchat!" yells BaMusa; "Hoop, hoop, hoop!" the monkeys reply). Diakité's version imparts a new moral: only after the man eats some of the monkey's mangoes can he think with a clear head‘and reclaim his hats. Ceramic-tile paintings on each spread depict the action in fluid, bold brushwork with man and creatures outlined in white against backgrounds of nearly transparent blue sky. Opposite each full-color tile image, a page with brief text set against a white background shows off a spot line drawing. Diakité then frames each page with a ring of monkeys in silhouette tumbling over one another. The handsome design emphasizes the detailed artwork of the tree teeming with life: leaves, mangoes, lizards, dragonflies, bats and butterflies, as well as the scampering monkeys sporting BaMusa's brightly threaded hats. In this retelling, Diakité's use of language is as colorful and unusual as his artwork. Ages 4-7. (Feb.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

K-Gr 3‘A West African version of the beloved folktale about a peddler whose hats are stolen by monkeys. The story has been fleshed out a bit with African words and background about the hatseller's life. Hurrying to a festival, BaMusa does not take time to eat breakfast. When he takes a nap beneath a tree, playful monkeys steal his wares. After being showered with mangoes, the man has a snack and figures out how to get his hats back. The moral is: "it is with a full stomach that one thinks best." Diakité illustrates the tale with lively and authentic ceramic tile paintings that are faintly reminiscent of, but not as elegant as, Leo and Diane Dillon's illustrations for Why Mosquitoes Buzz in People's Ears (Dial, 1975),. Each page is bordered with drawings of monkeys in a variety of poses. An author's note gives sources and lists other variants, including the perennial favorite, Esphyr Slobodkina's Caps for Sale (HarperCollins, 1947). Libraries owning other versions of this tale, such as Susanne Suba's The Monkeys and the Pedlar (Viking, 1970; o.p.), will also want to consider The Hatseller. It deserves a place on the African folktale shelves with Barbara Knutson's Sungura and Leopard (Little, Brown, 1993; o.p.) and Angela Shelf Medearis's Too Much Talk (Candlewick, 1995).‘Pam Gosner, formerly at Maplewood Memorial Library, NJ (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


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