Cover image for Fair ball! : 14 great stars from baseball's Negro leagues
Title:
Fair ball! : 14 great stars from baseball's Negro leagues
Author:
Winter, Jonah, 1962-
Personal Author:
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
New York : Scholastic Press, 1999.
Physical Description:
1 volume (unpaged) : color illustrations ; 26 cm
Summary:
Short biographies of fourteen outstanding players in the United States Negro Leagues, including Pop Lloyd, Oscar Charleston, and Buck Leonard.
Language:
English
Contents:
Rube Foster -- Willie Foster -- Satchel Paige -- Josh Gibson -- Biz Mackey -- Buck Leonard -- Mule Suttles -- Bingo DeMoss -- Martin Dihigo -- Judy Johnson -- Boojum Wilson -- Pop Lloyd -- Cool Papa Bell -- Oscar Charleston.
Reading Level:
770 Lexile.
Program Information:
Reading Counts RC 3-5 4.7 2 Quiz: 18733.
ISBN:
9780590394642
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Frank E. Merriweather Library GV865.A1 W56 1999 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Summary

Summary

Most young baseball fans have heard of Babe Ruth and Lou Gehrig, but what about "Pop" Lloyd or Buck Leonard? Including full-page portraits and fascinating information, this stunning book profiles fourteen legends of baseball's Negro Leagues.


Author Notes

Children's author and illustrator Jonah Winter was born in Fort Worth, Texas in 1962. He has created many popular books, including works about baseball and biographies of famous individuals including Frida Kahlo, Roberto Clemente, and Barack Obama.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

Gr. 3^-5. Sometimes celebrated for their literary merit, baseball books seldom receive accolades for their artwork. Here, Winter's distinctive, painterly illustrations make the strongest statements in the book, conveying a powerful sense of the presence and personality of each man portrayed. This illustrated guide to the Negro Leagues features information about each player on the left-hand page; opposite are the portraits proportioned like a supersized baseball card. Players include Cool Papa Bell, Josh Gibson, Judy Johnson, Satchel Paige, and Martin Dihigo. Though similar in concept to Lawrence Ritter's Leagues Apart (1995), this book covers only 18 players, allowing for fuller coverage. Each entry contains personal information as well as a player's career history and a few paragraphs describing his accomplishments, stats, and personal style. Evidently based on photographs, some posed and others capturing action on the field, Winter's highly individualized pictures make their statements through heightened contrast, broad areas of flat or textured color, and a sure sense of composition. Written in a colloquial style, this book conveys Winter's enthusiasm for his subject. A good link between Ritter's book for somewhat younger readers and longer nonfiction on the history of the Negro Leagues. --Carolyn Phelan


Publisher's Weekly Review

"Certain to be a hit with kids who take baseball seriously, this volume devotes a spread each to 14 stars of the Negro Leagues, from pitcher Satchel Paige to center fielder Oscar Charleston," said PW. Ages 7-10. (Apr.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

Gr 3-6-Each of these Negro-League players is accorded a page of text and a full-color painting. While brief, the profiles do convey something of the character and significance of each athlete. Readers learn, for instance, that legendary New York Giants manager John McGraw considered Negro Leagues star Oscar Charleston to be the greatest player he ever saw, and that Cool Papa Bell was so fast that "he could turn off the light and be in bed before it was dark." Players who were positive role models for youngsters are duly noted, as are those who were not: it is made clear that both Charleston and Boojum Wilson were mean, ill-tempered individuals who loved to fight. There are points about which one could quibble (e.g., Winter's assertion that Rube Foster "invented" the squeeze play, hit-and-run, and double steal) but on balance this is a good, highly accessible introduction to a group of athletes who deserve to be as well known as their white counterparts.-Richard Luzer, Fair Haven Union High School, VT (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


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