Cover image for Black cat
Title:
Black cat
Author:
Myers, Christopher A.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York / Scholastic Press, 1999.
Physical Description:
1 volume (unpaged) : color illustrations ; 29 cm
Summary:
A black cat wanders through the streets of a city.
Language:
English
Reading Level:
NP Lexile.
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR LG 3.6 0.5 29517.

Reading Counts RC 3-5 2.6 1 Quiz: 16570 Guided reading level: J.
ISBN:
9780590033756
Format :
Book

Available:*

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Central Library PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Childrens Area-Picture Books
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Newstead Library PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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Clearfield Library PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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Clearfield Library X Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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East Aurora Library PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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Elma Library PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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Grand Island Library PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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Frank E. Merriweather Library PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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Frank E. Merriweather Library PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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On Order

Summary

Summary

"Arresting photo-collage artwork and hip-hop poetry tell the story of a stray cat's search for a home as it slinks its way through city streets...Pulses with city rhythms and scenarios, just waiting to be discovered and discussed." - School Library Journal, starred review "Edgy, visceral, this dazzling book captures the rhythms of the city and the gritty beauty of the urban landscape." - The Horn Book Coretta Scott


Author Notes

Christopher Myers may have inherited some of his talent from his father, Walter Dean Myers, or his grandfather, who "was a storyteller," says Myers. "His thick callused hands told stories. My father tells stories. I tell stories." "Illustrating children's books is a trip. So many people are starving for images. (There is an) image famine in African America. I think we are learning how important images are, how much they do." Myers's book, Harlem, which he collaborated on with his father, was named a Caldecott Honor Book. In reviewing it, Booklist observed that "the artist sees a concrete city composed of 'colors loud enough to be heard.'" This talented artist, who works in collages, photos, and woodcuts, graduated from Brown University and completed the independent study program at the Whitney Museum of American Art. He lives in Brooklyn, New York. For more information about Christopher Myers, visit: scholastic.com/tradebooks


Reviews 4

Booklist Review

Gr. 3^-8. The illustrator of the Caldecott Honor Book Harlem (1998) contributes both words and text in this picture book that will have an exceptionally wide audience. Elementary-school children will focus on the progress of a sleek black cat as it travels along quiet city streets, over rooftops, and into the subway, seemingly intent on some destination it alone knows. Older children, even some in junior high, will focus more on the pulse of the rap in the words and be drawn to the surreal images of the city, a place many of them will recognize as home. Myers' collages, all angles and concrete, photos and paint, are a maze of intriguing perspectives. They show the drama, the danger, and the quiet of the city, softened only by the presence of the sleek black cat. A potent combination of modern art, photography, rhythm, and words. --Stephanie Zvirin


Publisher's Weekly Review

An unseen narrator follows a lone black cat posing the refrain, "Where is your home?" in this ingenious tour of an urban landscape. If Myers's montage illustrations for Harlem paid homage to its people and history, here the mixed media images revere the starkness and beauty of the city streets themselves. As the stealthy feline, subtly comprised of dark fabric swatches with delicate patterns, makes its way down to the subways and up to the rooftops, the creature moves gracefully and purposefully. Rarely, save for a stop at the basketball courts or the playground, does the cat encounter anyone else, yet it never seems frightened or lonely. Myers imbues even the night vistas with pulsing purples, greens and oranges that seem to insulate the cat from harm, and the design plays up Myers's exquisite color sense. In one spread, for instance, a rose-colored trio of apartment buildings enveloped by a fiery sky appears alongside an image of the cat atop a darkened brick wall next to a quartet of glass green bottles with just a hint of rosy-streaked yellow sky in the background. The text itself reads like captions to the striking images, which develop a visual rhythm of their own: the metal pillars of a subway station echo in the bars of the "playground cages" and fire escapes; the honeycomb-like quality of the chain-link fences reappears in the backboard of a basketball hoop. Myers thus creates a comforting, familiar world for the cat, which exudes confidence as it answers the text's recurring question: home is "anywere I roam." Ages 5-up. (Apr.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


Library Journal Review

Gr 2-5-A rhythmic ramble through an urban landscape led by a sleek and savvy feline. Striking collage paintings and hip verse pulsate with the sights and sounds of the city. (Mar.) (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


School Library Journal Review

Gr 2-5-Dramatic, evocative perspectives capture the sense of the inner city and the enigmatic existence of a street-smart, no-nonsense cat roaming there. Rhythmic poetry poses questions about the golden-eyed animal with lines like: "black cat, black cat, we want to know/where's your home, where do you go?" As readers follow the creature across car hoods, wire fence rims, and into subway cars, the starkness and harshness of the city are provocatively drawn. The bold collage art that incorporates photographs, ink, and gouache contrasts the sinuous movements of the cat against the angular urban cityscape of roof tops, ball courts, and fire escapes. Myers's style carries a familiarity from Harlem (Scholastic, 1997) but here the illustrations are full page, with no white space, and the white-and-colored text on black backgrounds adds to the somewhat ominous tone, effectively conveying a secretive, haunting mood shaped by lingering images. This creative work pulses with city rhythms and scenarios, just waiting to be discovered and discussed.-Julie Cummins, New York Public Library (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


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