Cover image for The wood warblers : an introductory guide
Title:
The wood warblers : an introductory guide
Author:
Schorre, Barth, 1926-
Personal Author:
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
Austin : University of Texas Press, 1998.
Physical Description:
xix, 140 pages : color illustrations ; 22 cm.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780292777293

9780292777309
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library QL696.P2438 S34 1998 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Summary

Summary

Wood warbler migrations every spring and fall are one of the most anticipated highlights of the North American birder's year. The warblers' frequently colorful appearance and distinctive songs make them especially attractive birds to observe, but their quick, darting movements, often among the highest branches of the trees, can make it difficult to tell one species from another. This book is a handy beginner's pictorial guide to the identification of forty-nine wood warbler species that commonly nest in the United States and Canada. Barth Schorre's outstanding color photographs help you distinguish each species. (Both males and females are usually shown when they differ significantly in appearance.) An accompanying description gives each species' common and Latin names, average length, general range, relative abundance, and identifying characteristics. Schorre also briefly discusses the life history and migratory patterns of warblers, the diminishing numbers of some species, and ways to attract warblers to your yard.


Summary

Wood warbler migrations every spring and fall are one of the most anticipated highlights of the North American birder's year. The warblers' frequently colorful appearance and distinctive songs make them especially attractive birds to observe, but their quick, darting movements, often among the highest branches of the trees, can make it difficult to tell one species from another. This book is a handy beginner's pictorial guide to the identification of forty-nine wood warbler species that commonly nest in the United States and Canada. Barth Schorre's outstanding color photographs help you distinguish each species. (Both males and females are usually shown when they differ significantly in appearance.) An accompanying description gives each species' common and Latin names, average length, general range, relative abundance, and identifying characteristics. Schorre also briefly discusses the life history and migratory patterns of warblers, the diminishing numbers of some species, and ways to attract warblers to your yard.


Reviews 2

Choice Review

Schorre's charming little book is difficult to categorize. It is neither a field guide nor a monograph, yet it is more than a photographic essay. For 20 years, the author has patiently photographed the small, elusive, hyperactive wood warblers as they migrate through Texas. The photographs are some of the best ever of this group of birds: clear, interesting, and well printed at about two-thirds life size. Each of the North American species is pictured and accompanied by a page of information about the bird, primarily from the author's own experience. There are also short chapters on population decline of some species, migration, distribution, and techniques for attracting warblers. The book is attractively produced and has a brief section on suggested reading and a short index. Undergraduate and research libraries should have general reference works such as the National Geographic Society's Field Guide to the Birds of North America (1989), the American Ornithologists' Union's "Birds of North America" series, and the monograph by Jon J. Dunn and Kimball L. Garrett, A Field Guide to Warblers of North America (1997) before acquiring this book. It is, however, a worthwhile addition to most collections because the photographs are superior to those in photographic field guides. All levels. T. C. Williams; Swarthmore College


Choice Review

Schorre's charming little book is difficult to categorize. It is neither a field guide nor a monograph, yet it is more than a photographic essay. For 20 years, the author has patiently photographed the small, elusive, hyperactive wood warblers as they migrate through Texas. The photographs are some of the best ever of this group of birds: clear, interesting, and well printed at about two-thirds life size. Each of the North American species is pictured and accompanied by a page of information about the bird, primarily from the author's own experience. There are also short chapters on population decline of some species, migration, distribution, and techniques for attracting warblers. The book is attractively produced and has a brief section on suggested reading and a short index. Undergraduate and research libraries should have general reference works such as the National Geographic Society's Field Guide to the Birds of North America (1989), the American Ornithologists' Union's "Birds of North America" series, and the monograph by Jon J. Dunn and Kimball L. Garrett, A Field Guide to Warblers of North America (1997) before acquiring this book. It is, however, a worthwhile addition to most collections because the photographs are superior to those in photographic field guides. All levels. T. C. Williams; Swarthmore College


Table of Contents

ForewordJohn Rappole
Preface
Acknowledgments
Introduction
Diminishing Numbers
Distribution
Migration
Attracting Warblers
Warbler Identification
The Gallery of Warblers
References and Further Reading
Index
ForewordJohn Rappole
Preface
Acknowledgments
Introduction
Diminishing Numbers
Distribution
Migration
Attracting Warblers
Warbler Identification
The Gallery of Warblers
References and Further Reading
Index

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