Cover image for 20th century revolutions in technology
Title:
20th century revolutions in technology
Author:
Singer, Edward.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Commack, NY : Nova Science Pub., 1998.
Physical Description:
xviii, 440 pages : illustrations ; 27 cm
Language:
English
ISBN:
9781560724322
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library T173.8 .S568 1998 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
Searching...

On Order

Summary

Summary

20th Century Revolutions in Technology


Reviews 1

Choice Review

Singer, an engineer and two-year college professor, offers a general or introductory work for nonscientists, in 15 chapters. Broad subjects covered are electricity, uses of electromagnetic waves (radio and TV), the transistor, computers, laser technology, satellites, communications, automobiles, flight, medicine, genetic engineering, food technology, artificial materials (synthetics, plastics, and composite materials), and atomic energy. Each chapter is about 30 pages long and contains a brief history, including biographical information regarding key figures, and an explanation of key concepts. The chapters also include a discussion of the benefits and problems associated with these technologies, with solutions for the problems. Useful chapter bibliographies; short, well-written chapters suitable for students in general education studies. General readers; lower-division undergraduates. J. Olson; Northeastern Illinois University


Table of Contents

Applying Electricity to Everything From Toothbrushes to Air Conditioners
Using the Electromagnetic Wave to Hear and See At a Distance
How Many Transistors Can Dance on the Head of a Pin?
Adding a Brain
Let There Be Pure Light
Recording in the 20th Century
The Revolution of the Artificial Moon
Moving Towards Personal Universal Communications
Leaving the Horses Behind
On the Wings of Eagles
Marrying Technology to Medicine
Playing God with Genetic Engineering
20th Century Food Developments
Using Artificial Materials
Extracting Energy From the Atom
Epilogue

Google Preview