Cover image for The world within the brain
Title:
The world within the brain
Author:
Weiss, Malcolm E.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : J. Messner [1974]
Physical Description:
191 pages : illustrations ; 22 cm
Summary:
Discusses the physiology of the human brain and some of the methods used by scientists to try to control behavior.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780671326630

9780671326647
Format :
Book

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Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library QP376 .W44 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Summary

Summary

William Cobbett (1763--1835) was at various times a soldier, a farmer, a radical activist and politician, and a journalist. At a time when the Industrial Revolution was dramatically changing the face of rural Britain, Cobbett was constantly concerned with improving the living conditions of the labouring classes. First published in 1821 as a series of pamphlets that sold over 30,000 copies, Cottage Economy demonstrates Cobbett's philosophy that the labourer should be taught industry, sobriety, frugality and 'the duty of using his best exertions for the rearing of his family'. With practical instructions, still relevant to those who seek to become self-reliant, Cobbett teaches the labouring classes of the nineteenth century the arts of brewing beer, keeping livestock, making bread, and 'other matters deemed useful in the conducting of the Affairs of a Labourer's Family.' Cottage Economy performs timelessly as the quintessential guide to self-sufficiency.


Summary

William Cobbett (1763–1835) was at various times a soldier, a farmer, a radical activist and politician, and a journalist. At a time when the Industrial Revolution was dramatically changing the face of rural Britain, Cobbett was constantly concerned with improving the living conditions of the labouring classes. First published in 1821 as a series of pamphlets that sold over 30,000 copies, Cottage Economy demonstrates Cobbett's philosophy that the labourer should be taught industry, sobriety, frugality and 'the duty of using his best exertions for the rearing of his family'. With practical instructions, still relevant to those who seek to become self-reliant, Cobbett teaches the labouring classes of the nineteenth century the arts of brewing beer, keeping livestock, making bread, and 'other matters deemed useful in the conducting of the Affairs of a Labourer's Family.' Cottage Economy performs timelessly as the quintessential guide to self-sufficiency.


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