Cover image for Joan of Arc
Title:
Joan of Arc
Author:
Stanley, Diane.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : Morrow Junior Books, [1998]

©1998
Physical Description:
1 volume (unpaged) : color illustrations ; 29 cm
Summary:
A biography of the fifteenth-century peasant girl who led a French army to victory against the English and was burned at the stake for witchcraft.
Language:
English
Reading Level:
980 Lexile.
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR LG 6.9 1.0 32565.

Reading Counts RC 3-5 5.9 3 Quiz: 19849.
ISBN:
9780688143299

9780688143305
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library DC103.5 .S66 1998 Juvenile Non-Fiction Childrens Area-Biography
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Clarence Library DC103.5 .S66 1998 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Clearfield Library DC103.5 .S66 1998 Juvenile Non-Fiction Biography
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Concord Library DC103.5 .S66 1998 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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East Aurora Library DC103.5 .S66 1998 Juvenile Non-Fiction Biography
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Grand Island Library DC103.5 .S66 1998 Juvenile Non-Fiction Biography
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Hamburg Library DC103.5 .S66 1998 Juvenile Non-Fiction Biography
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Lackawanna Library DC103.5 .S66 1998 Juvenile Non-Fiction Biography
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Lake Shore Library DC103.5 .S66 1998 Juvenile Non-Fiction Biography
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Orchard Park Library DC103.5 .S66 1998 Juvenile Non-Fiction Biography
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Riverside Branch Library DC103.5 .S66 1998 Juvenile Non-Fiction Biography
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Williamsville Library DC103.5 .S66 1998 Juvenile Non-Fiction Biography
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Julia Boyer Reinstein Library DC103.5 .S66 1998 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Audubon Library DC103.5 .S66 1998 Juvenile Non-Fiction Biography
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On Order

Summary

Summary

Joan was a child whose country suffered under the horrors of invasion and civil war. By 19, she was called the savior of France--and a heretic who was killed by being burned at the stake. Almost 500-years later, she was declared a saint. Full-color illustrations.


Author Notes

Diane Stanley was born in 1943 and was raised in Abilene, Texas. She later attended both Trinity University and Johns Hopkins University.

Her portfolio of children's book illustrations was creative enough for her to begin publication in 1978. She became an art director for G.P. Putnam & Sons and later began retelling and illustrating classic children's books.

Stanley has revamped the fairy tale, Rumpelstiltskin's Daughter and has also researched the children's biographies Cleopatra and Leonardo Da Vinci. She also illustrated her mother's book, The Last Princess.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

Poole, Ages 5^-8; Stanley, Gr. 4^-8. Two books in one season about Joan of Arc might seem like one too many; however, these volumes each have a different audience, a different slant on the material, and distinct artistic visions. Poole sprints through the story of the young French girl who heard voices telling her to help a young heir to the throne regain his kingdom. The text mixes the high adventure of Joan's crusade with the maiden's most personal reactions to the dramatic events engulfing her life: her fear and then her joy at the appearance of her Voices; her bravery through war and inquisition; and her grief and anxiety when she is betrayed and tossed into the arms of her enemies. Barrett's lovely illustrations are alternately pastoral, celestial, and spirited. The spreads sweep along and will gather younger readers with their zeal. A chronology is appended. Anyone who knows Stanley's picture-book biographies will be familiar with her meticulous attention to detail. That quality shines here in both the detailed text and the gilded artwork that echoes medieval illuminated manuscripts. Stanley not only chooses to write about Joan's life but also sets up the political situation in France and England that leads to her battles. Although that particular bit of history is complicated, Stanley writes vividly and usually pares down the material to manageable bites. The artwork in Stanley's books is always outstanding, but here the pictures are quite glorious: the colors are rich, the compositions are intricate, and the book's total design is impressive. A preface outlines the Hundred Years' War, and a bibliography is appended. Libraries should try to find room on their shelves for both of these fine volumes. --Ilene Cooper


Publisher's Weekly Review

Stanley (Leonardo da Vinci) orchestrates the complexities of history into a gripping, unusually challenging story in this exemplary biography. As much a portrait of an age as of a person, her work here carefully and accessibly establishes the context of Joan's life, explaining the Hundred Years' War and its impact on ordinary people. Judiciously chosen details build atmosphere in both the text and the artwork‘painstakingly wrought, gilded paintings modeled after the illuminated manuscripts of Joan's day. Providing a more rounded view than in Poole's biography (see above review), Stanley quotes Joan and her contemporaries (and cites her sources), describes pivotal moments in battle and insightfully chronicles Joan's trial, imprisonment, recantation, execution and posthumous rehabilitation. The immaculate paintings, too, testify to scrupulous research (cathedrals, weaponry, landscapes are accurately depicted) and artistry (for example, the paintings are shaped irregularly but symmetrically, like altarpieces). At the end, Stanley offers readers different theories about Joan's "voices," and concludes, "Sometimes, in studying history, we have to accept what we know and let the rest remain a mystery." Appealing to the audience's intelligence and imagination, this book stimulates an interest in both its particular subject, Joan of Arc, and history in general. Ages 8-up. (Sept.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

Gr 4-7-This magnificent picture book exemplifies the author's talent for historical research, skill in writing clear and interesting prose, and ability to adopt different art styles and techniques appropriate to her subject. Joan of Arc's story is both history and mystery. How a peasant girl living in a class-structured century, a female in a man's world of war and politics, an unlettered visionary in a church-dominated society could change the course of history has been an ever-intriguing puzzle. Stanley finds answers in Joan's own words spoken before the Inquisition during her trial for heresy and in the 115 eyewitness accounts recorded in the Trial of Rehabilitation held after her martyrdom. From these 15th-century documents and other sources, the author weaves an absorbing and convincing story of a naive, brave, and driven young woman willing to face death to accomplish God's will as she heard it in her "voices." Stanley does not answer the question of whether Joan's role was divine or human in origin, concluding, "Sometimes, in studying history, we have to accept what we know and let the rest remain a mystery." The meticulously designed pages and colorful, decoratively framed illustrations are full of details from Joan's era. Decorative banners, costumes, scenes with crowds of soldiers and nobles, rooms with patterned floors, and gabled houses and crenellated castles reflect the bright world of the Flemish art of the late Middle Ages. Joan is pictured as young and serene, an innocent child among a throng of cynical warriors and disapproving priests. This narrative description of the greatest of French saints is a work of art, a good story, and a model of historical writing.-Shirley Wilton, Ocean County College, Toms River, NJ (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


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