Cover image for Tell it again! : easy-to-tell stories with activities for young children
Title:
Tell it again! : easy-to-tell stories with activities for young children
Author:
Raines, Shirley C.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Beltsville, Md. : Gryphon House, [1999]

©1999
Physical Description:
208 pages : illustrations ; 26 cm
Language:
English
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780876592007
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Orchard Park Library LB1042 .R25 1999 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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West Seneca Library LB1042 .R25 1999 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Frank E. Merriweather Library LB1042 .R25 1999 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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On Order

Summary

Summary

The 18 stories in Tell It Again! were written to engage young children's lively minds and capture their undivided attention. For each story there are storytelling tips and activities. The activities connect the stories to active learning in listening, communication, imagination and problem-solving. The story cards enable the reader to be a master storyteller.


Author Notes

Christy Isbell, Ph.D., is the Program Director and Associate Professor for the Occupational Therapy Program at Milligan College in Tennessee. She teaches child development, human development, and pediatric therapy courses for the Masters of Occupational Therapy Program. Additionally, Dr. Isbell is Board Certified in Pediatrics and maintains specialty training in sensory integration and neuro-developmental treatment techniques.


Reviews 1

School Library Journal Review

Retellings of 18 children's stories along with activities to reinforce math, art, music, and cooking skills. The target audience is said to be "young children," but it is unclear whether that term refers to preschool, early elementary, or beyond. The retellings themselves are unimpressive. Attempts to truncate Hans Christian Andersen's "The Nightingale" and "The Ugly Duckling" serve only to diminish the power and beauty of the original stories. The authors feel obliged to conclude each story with a moral "so that the storyteller can focus on the inherent value or `truth' of a story." However, the logic behind some of these morals is questionable. The one for "The Lost Mitten with Tiny, Shiny Beads" (a version of the Ukrainian folktale) is said to be "Always make room for one more in your group." Given the fact that the mitten explodes because the animals try to squeeze everyone in, this is a puzzling conclusion. Raines's "Story Stretchers" series (Gryphon House) is far superior to this offering, and Margaret Read MacDonald's The Storyteller's Start-up Book (August House, 1993) is a better choice for beginning tellers.-Grace Oliff, Ann Blanche Smith School, Hillsdale, NJ (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


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