Cover image for Out of the mouths of slaves : African American language and educational malpractice
Title:
Out of the mouths of slaves : African American language and educational malpractice
Author:
Baugh, John, 1949-
Personal Author:
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
Austin : University of Texas Press, 1999.
Physical Description:
xviii, 190 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780292708723

9780292708730
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library PE3102.N42 B39 1999 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Summary

Summary

John Baugh, an authority on African American English, dissects and challenges many of the prevailing myths about African American language and its place in American society.


Summary

Winner, A Choice Outstanding Academic Book

When the Oakland, California, school board called African American English "Ebonics" and claimed that it "is not a black dialect or any dialect of English," they reignited a debate over language, race, and culture that reaches back to the era of slavery in the United States. In this book, John Baugh, an authority on African American English, sets new parameters for the debate by dissecting and challenging many of the prevailing myths about African American language and its place in American society.

Baugh's inquiry ranges from the origins of African American English among slaves and their descendants to its recent adoption by standard English speakers of various races. Some of the topics he considers include practices and malpractices for educating language minority students, linguistic discrimination in the administration of justice, cross-cultural communication between Blacks and whites, and specific linguistic aspects of African American English. This detailed overview of the main points of debate about African American language will be important reading for both scholars and the concerned public.


Reviews 2

Choice Review

Baugh (education and linguistics, Stanford) offers a more comprehensive study of African American vernacular English (AAVE) in this book than he did in Beyond Ebonics (CH, Jul'00). One of the central chapters, "Educational Malpractice and the Ebonics Controversy," bears a close kinship to the earlier title. This ethnographic study, partially based on the author's experience as a black scholar denied housing because of his color, explodes many myths relating to AAVE and to societal reactions to both the language and its speakers. It builds on earlier studies, notably J.L. Dillard's Black English (CH, Dec'72) and William Labov's Language in the Inner City (CH, Dec'73). Baugh's conclusions--sound, penetrating, extensive--are drawn from careful empirical research, central to which is an experiment presented in one of the book's most fruitful chapters, "Linguistic Perceptions in Black and White: Racial Identification Based on Speech." Baugh invokes medical analogies in discussing educational malpractice; however, he neglects to acknowledge two crucial differences between medicine and education: (1) physicians usually meet patients on a one-to-one basis, and (2) physicians can summarily dismiss uncooperative patients whereas many inner-city teachers have to deal daily with uncooperative and disruptive students. Includes a glossary. Strongly recommended for students and scholars of linguistics, sociology, and education at upper-division undergraduate level and above. R. B. Shuman; University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign


Choice Review

Baugh (education and linguistics, Stanford) offers a more comprehensive study of African American vernacular English (AAVE) in this book than he did in Beyond Ebonics (CH, Jul'00). One of the central chapters, "Educational Malpractice and the Ebonics Controversy," bears a close kinship to the earlier title. This ethnographic study, partially based on the author's experience as a black scholar denied housing because of his color, explodes many myths relating to AAVE and to societal reactions to both the language and its speakers. It builds on earlier studies, notably J.L. Dillard's Black English (CH, Dec'72) and William Labov's Language in the Inner City (CH, Dec'73). Baugh's conclusions--sound, penetrating, extensive--are drawn from careful empirical research, central to which is an experiment presented in one of the book's most fruitful chapters, "Linguistic Perceptions in Black and White: Racial Identification Based on Speech." Baugh invokes medical analogies in discussing educational malpractice; however, he neglects to acknowledge two crucial differences between medicine and education: (1) physicians usually meet patients on a one-to-one basis, and (2) physicians can summarily dismiss uncooperative patients whereas many inner-city teachers have to deal daily with uncooperative and disruptive students. Includes a glossary. Strongly recommended for students and scholars of linguistics, sociology, and education at upper-division undergraduate level and above. R. B. Shuman; University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign


Table of Contents

ForewordWilliam Labov
Preface
Acknowledgments
Part 1 Orientation
1 Some Common Misconceptions about African American Vernacular English
2 Language and Race: Some Implications of Bias for Linguistic Science
Part 2 The Relevance of African American Vernacular English to Education and Social Policies
3 Why What Works Has Not Worked for Nontraditional Students
4 Reading, Writing, and Rap: Lyric Shuffle and Other Motivational Strategies to Introduce and Reinforce Literacy
5 Educational Malpractice and the Ebonics Controversy
6 Linguistic Discrimination and American justice
Part 3 Cross-cultural Communication in Social Context
7 The Politics of Black Power Handshakes
8 Changing Terms of Self-reference among American Slave Descendants
Part 4 Linguistic Dimensions of African American Vernacular English
9 Steady: Progressive Aspect in African American Vernacular English
10 Come Again: Discourse Functions in African American Vernacular English
11 Hypocorrection: Mistakes in the Production of African American Vernacular English as a Second Dialect
12 Linguistic Perceptions in Black and White: Racial Identification Based on Speech
Part 5 Conclusion
13 Research Trends for African American Vernacular English: Anthropology, Education, and Linguistics
Notes
Glossary
References
Index
ForewordWilliam Labov
Preface
Acknowledgments
Part 1 Orientation
1 Some Common Misconceptions about African American Vernacular English
2 Language and Race: Some Implications of Bias for Linguistic Science
Part 2 The Relevance of African American Vernacular English to Education and Social Policies
3 Why What Works Has Not Worked for Nontraditional Students
4 Reading, Writing, and Rap: Lyric Shuffle and Other Motivational Strategies to Introduce and Reinforce Literacy
5 Educational Malpractice and the Ebonics Controversy
6 Linguistic Discrimination and American justice
Part 3 Cross-cultural Communication in Social Context
7 The Politics of Black Power Handshakes
8 Changing Terms of Self-reference among American Slave Descendants
Part 4 Linguistic Dimensions of African American Vernacular English
9 Steady: Progressive Aspect in African American Vernacular English
10 Come Again: Discourse Functions in African American Vernacular English
11 Hypocorrection: Mistakes in the Production of African American Vernacular English as a Second Dialect
12 Linguistic Perceptions in Black and White: Racial Identification Based on Speech
Part 5 Conclusion
13 Research Trends for African American Vernacular English: Anthropology, Education, and Linguistics
Notes
Glossary
References
Index

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