Cover image for Doin' drugs : patterns of African American addiction
Title:
Doin' drugs : patterns of African American addiction
Author:
James, William H. (William Henry), 1940-
Publication Information:
Austin : University of Texas Press, [1996]

©1996
Physical Description:
xiv, 173 pages ; 24 cm
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780292740402

9780292740419
Format :
Book

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Call Number
Material Type
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Status
Central Library HV5824.E85 J36 1996 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Summary

Summary

Throughout the African American community, individuals and organizations ranging from churches to schools to drug treatment centers are fighting the widespread use of crack cocaine. To put that fight in a larger cultural context, Doin' Drugs explores historical patterns of alcohol and drug use from pre-slavery Africa to present-day urban America. William Henry James and Stephen Lloyd Johnson document the role of alcohol and other drugs in traditional African cultures, among African slaves before the American Civil War, and in contemporary African American society, which has experienced the epidemics of marijuana, heroin, crack cocaine, and gangs since the beginning of this century. The authors zero in on the interplay of addiction and race to uncover the social and psychological factors that underlie addiction. James and Johnson also highlight many culturally informed programs, particularly those sponsored by African American churches, that are successfully breaking the patterns of addiction. The authors hope that the information in this book will be used to train a new generation of counselors, ministers, social workers, nurses, and physicians to be better prepared to face the epidemic of drug addiction in African American communities.


Summary

Throughout the African American community, individuals and organizations ranging from churches to schools to drug treatment centers are fighting the widespread use of crack cocaine. To put that fight in a larger cultural context, Doin' Drugs explores historical patterns of alcohol and drug use from pre-slavery Africa to present-day urban America.

William Henry James and Stephen Lloyd Johnson document the role of alcohol and other drugs in traditional African cultures, among African slaves before the American Civil War, and in contemporary African American society, which has experienced the epidemics of marijuana, heroin, crack cocaine, and gangs since the beginning of this century. The authors zero in on the interplay of addiction and race to uncover the social and psychological factors that underlie addiction.

James and Johnson also highlight many culturally informed programs, particularly those sponsored by African American churches, that are successfully breaking the patterns of addiction. The authors hope that the information in this book will be used to train a new generation of counselors, ministers, social workers, nurses, and physicians to be better prepared to face the epidemic of drug addiction in African American communities.


Reviews 2

Choice Review

By examining the historical and modern patterns of African American addiction, James and Johnson aim to provide a more comprehensive understanding of the reciprocal relationship between addiction and race. Education and knowledge are viewed as the means to more effective race-based addiction treatment. The authors argue that through this increased awareness, better preparation and education can be provided to those professionals who work with this population. The first two chapters deal exclusively with African American drug use from a historical perspective. The succeeding four chapters examine the relationship between race and specific drugs such as alcohol, cigarettes and marijuana, and opiates and cocaine. Finally, the authors consider linkages between factors in the social environment and the use of drugs. For example, they discuss gangs and the African American church, showing their part in the development or deterrence of drug use. To support their general thesis James and Johnson rely on empirical data, historical analysis, and case studies. This work offers a respectable primer on issues specific to African American drug use and also illustrates the problems inherent in minority drug treatment. Upper-division undergraduates and above. M. A. Norton-Hawk; Northeastern University


Choice Review

By examining the historical and modern patterns of African American addiction, James and Johnson aim to provide a more comprehensive understanding of the reciprocal relationship between addiction and race. Education and knowledge are viewed as the means to more effective race-based addiction treatment. The authors argue that through this increased awareness, better preparation and education can be provided to those professionals who work with this population. The first two chapters deal exclusively with African American drug use from a historical perspective. The succeeding four chapters examine the relationship between race and specific drugs such as alcohol, cigarettes and marijuana, and opiates and cocaine. Finally, the authors consider linkages between factors in the social environment and the use of drugs. For example, they discuss gangs and the African American church, showing their part in the development or deterrence of drug use. To support their general thesis James and Johnson rely on empirical data, historical analysis, and case studies. This work offers a respectable primer on issues specific to African American drug use and also illustrates the problems inherent in minority drug treatment. Upper-division undergraduates and above. M. A. Norton-Hawk; Northeastern University


Table of Contents

Preface
Acknowledgments
1 Historical Patterns of Alcohol and Drug Use
2 The Past Fifty Years
3 Alcohol
4 Cigarettes and Marijuana
5 Opiates
6 Cocaine
7 Gangs
8 The Church and Addiction
Conclusion
Bibliography
Index
Preface
Acknowledgments
1 Historical Patterns of Alcohol and Drug Use
2 The Past Fifty Years
3 Alcohol
4 Cigarettes and Marijuana
5 Opiates
6 Cocaine
7 Gangs
8 The Church and Addiction
Conclusion
Bibliography
Index

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