Cover image for Ghosts of the west coast : the lost souls of the Queen Mary and other real-life hauntings
Title:
Ghosts of the west coast : the lost souls of the Queen Mary and other real-life hauntings
Author:
Wood, Ted.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : Walker, 1999.
Physical Description:
48 pages : color illustrations ; 27 cm.
Summary:
Chronicles true ghost stories from Washington State, Oregon, and California, including those about the gold miners of Bodie State Historic Park, the Whaley House in San Diego, and the Heceta Head Lighthouse.
General Note:
Includes index.
Language:
English
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR MG 6.4 1.0 66472.
ISBN:
9780802786692

9780802786685
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Eden Library BF1472.U6 W664 1999 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Hamburg Library BF1472.U6 W664 1999 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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On Order

Summary

Summary

Fox offers a clear and important, if brief, consideration of the fiction of Baraka, Reed, and Delany. He renders an especially important service by establishing the relationship among three fictionists whose work has been substantially neglected. . . . Readers will find this volume useful as a starting point for the investigation of recent Afro-American fiction and as an example of the application of poststructuralist criticism to Afro-American fiction. Choice

This book is a provocative and enlightening study of the fiction of LeRoi Jones (Amiri Baraka), Ishmael Reed and Samuel R. Delany, three black American writers who are among the most gifted literary artists of the past twenty-five years. These authors, who emerged in the tumultuous period of the 1960s, when the complacencies of the previous decade were being challenged throughout the country, are examined here within the context of Afro-American literature.


Summary

Fox offers a clear and important, if brief, consideration of the fiction of Baraka, Reed, and Delany. He renders an especially important service by establishing the relationship among three fictionists whose work has been substantially neglected. . . . Readers will find this volume useful as a starting point for the investigation of recent Afro-American fiction and as an example of the application of poststructuralist criticism to Afro-American fiction. Choice

This book is a provocative and enlightening study of the fiction of LeRoi Jones (Amiri Baraka), Ishmael Reed and Samuel R. Delany, three black American writers who are among the most gifted literary artists of the past twenty-five years. These authors, who emerged in the tumultuous period of the 1960s, when the complacencies of the previous decade were being challenged throughout the country, are examined here within the context of Afro-American literature.


Reviews 4

Booklist Review

Gr. 3^-6. Wood continues his otherworldly series begun with Ghosts of the Southwest (1997), this time chronicling reports of phantoms from California, Oregon, and Washington. For each location (a variety of hotels, restaurants, homes, ships, prisons, parks, and missions), he provides a history of the site, reports from those purporting to have seen the specter, and accounts of the spirit's supernatural activities. Full-color photos appear on nearly every page; many have been altered so that they seem to include apparitions. Wood makes no effort to discount the reports of his informants or offer rational explanations for these sightings, and some young readers may have difficulty separating fact from fiction., particularly in light of the eerily lit, real-looking photographs. But if you're in the mood for a chilling, can't-put-it-down read, this will hit the spot. --Kay Weisman


School Library Journal Review

Gr 4-6A tantalizing trip to publicly accessible occult sites in California, Oregon, and Washington. In the introduction, a dramatically lit photograph of the famous San Jose, CA, Winchester Mystery House highlights Woods account of his own eerie experience there. He then lists some spots reportedly haunted by real ghosts and others that have turned out to be just local legends. The Hotel Del Coronado and the permanently docked Queen Mary boast sad and sometimes frightening apparitions from their colorful past. Here, as well as in missions, a theater, a marketplace, a ghost town, a lighthouse, historic homes, restaurants, Alcatraz, and even a modern toy store, various people relate spooky encounters. Nearly every site is made easily recognizable through large, atmospheric, exterior and interior photographs, sometimes populated by ghostly figures admittedly staged by the author. Simple state maps in the introduction and at each chapters beginning locate the haunted places while the index lists not only sites, but also the names and types of spirits described in the text. For each place, Wood carefully indicates the most likely times and spots where ghosts may be encountered. This is a wonderful combination of guidebook and chilling ghost stories that provides thrills to be savored many times over.Ann G. Brouse, Big Flats Branch Library, NY (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Booklist Review

Gr. 3^-6. Wood continues his otherworldly series begun with Ghosts of the Southwest (1997), this time chronicling reports of phantoms from California, Oregon, and Washington. For each location (a variety of hotels, restaurants, homes, ships, prisons, parks, and missions), he provides a history of the site, reports from those purporting to have seen the specter, and accounts of the spirit's supernatural activities. Full-color photos appear on nearly every page; many have been altered so that they seem to include apparitions. Wood makes no effort to discount the reports of his informants or offer rational explanations for these sightings, and some young readers may have difficulty separating fact from fiction., particularly in light of the eerily lit, real-looking photographs. But if you're in the mood for a chilling, can't-put-it-down read, this will hit the spot. --Kay Weisman


School Library Journal Review

Gr 4-6A tantalizing trip to publicly accessible occult sites in California, Oregon, and Washington. In the introduction, a dramatically lit photograph of the famous San Jose, CA, Winchester Mystery House highlights Woods account of his own eerie experience there. He then lists some spots reportedly haunted by real ghosts and others that have turned out to be just local legends. The Hotel Del Coronado and the permanently docked Queen Mary boast sad and sometimes frightening apparitions from their colorful past. Here, as well as in missions, a theater, a marketplace, a ghost town, a lighthouse, historic homes, restaurants, Alcatraz, and even a modern toy store, various people relate spooky encounters. Nearly every site is made easily recognizable through large, atmospheric, exterior and interior photographs, sometimes populated by ghostly figures admittedly staged by the author. Simple state maps in the introduction and at each chapters beginning locate the haunted places while the index lists not only sites, but also the names and types of spirits described in the text. For each place, Wood carefully indicates the most likely times and spots where ghosts may be encountered. This is a wonderful combination of guidebook and chilling ghost stories that provides thrills to be savored many times over.Ann G. Brouse, Big Flats Branch Library, NY (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


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