Cover image for The end of the class war
Title:
The end of the class war
Author:
Brady, Catherine, 1955-
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Corvallis, Or. : Calyx Books ; St. Paul, MN : Distributed to the trade through Consortium Book Sales and Distribution, Inc., [1999]

©1999
Physical Description:
241 pages ; 23 cm
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780934971676

9780934971669
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library X Adult Fiction Central Closed Stacks
Searching...

On Order

Summary

Summary

As stark and moving as "Angela's Ashes, " Brady's collection offers a poignantexploration of working-class Irish-American life.


Summary

Short Fiction. In the noisy, crowded kitchens of [Catherine Brady's] working-class Irish American households, proud, strong willed articulate women contend with the challenges of lonliness, poverty, and disabling illness. Blessed -- and cursed -- with a predisposition toward caring for others, Ms. Brady's heroines have an instinctive compassion for the fragile and the needy. They draw strength from their faith and their families to resist despair -- Jennifer C. Cornell). The little girls tumble on the lawn in their pajamas, their damp hair curled in ringlets their mother has carefully shaped around her finger before she let them out into the warm summer night. The girls do cartwheels, somersalts, wobbly headstands. They're a oneness, a jumble of seal-smooth, perfect bodies, sleek bellies bared when they reach their arms, lovely arched feet, firm rumps that could be cupped in two hands. Hiding from the camera, their mother crouches beside their aunt and uncle in their lawn chairs, plump and squat, her body an impossible o


Reviews 2

Publisher's Weekly Review

The 14 interlinked stories in this moving collection are beautifully crafted snapshots of Irish immigrants to American cities (Chicago, San Francisco) in 1950. "It's no mercy... seeing into the insides of things, into the secret ways by which the bones absorb shock and mend themselves... " but Brady does it with compassion and joy. Her short fictions capture critical moments in the lives of the working-class women who absorb shocks, mend, go on. The opening tale introduces "The Daley Girls," five sisters; their hard-working, hard-drinking, bewildered, enraged father, Joe; and their trapped, overworked, brutalized and heroic mother, Maureen. "Don't Walk," portrays Nora, the useful maiden aunt, who gave up her Ph.D., the engine of her escape, to help her mother care for her disabled father as she now helps her sister Maureen care for her children. In "Rumpelstiltskin," the damaged, crippled vets in the VA hospital long for the freedom of death, while in "Lives of the Saints," Danny, age seven, fights against the cruel restraints of spina bifida while his mother takes on other hopeless causes, knowing "suffering brings us closer to God." The overwhelming need to escape despair may be depressing, but these stories light the family's churning characters in full motionÄthey are jubilant, indomitable. Later, in "Home Movies" and "Driving," the Daley girls have grown up, following the current into middle-class America, no longer subject to the daily humiliations of the working-class poor. The final story presents three generations of women closely perceived, as they battle the cycle of life that is particularly female, burdened, courageous, kind and human. Agent, Jandy Nelson, Manus & Associates Literary Agency. (June) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


Publisher's Weekly Review

The 14 interlinked stories in this moving collection are beautifully crafted snapshots of Irish immigrants to American cities (Chicago, San Francisco) in 1950. "It's no mercy... seeing into the insides of things, into the secret ways by which the bones absorb shock and mend themselves... " but Brady does it with compassion and joy. Her short fictions capture critical moments in the lives of the working-class women who absorb shocks, mend, go on. The opening tale introduces "The Daley Girls," five sisters; their hard-working, hard-drinking, bewildered, enraged father, Joe; and their trapped, overworked, brutalized and heroic mother, Maureen. "Don't Walk," portrays Nora, the useful maiden aunt, who gave up her Ph.D., the engine of her escape, to help her mother care for her disabled father as she now helps her sister Maureen care for her children. In "Rumpelstiltskin," the damaged, crippled vets in the VA hospital long for the freedom of death, while in "Lives of the Saints," Danny, age seven, fights against the cruel restraints of spina bifida while his mother takes on other hopeless causes, knowing "suffering brings us closer to God." The overwhelming need to escape despair may be depressing, but these stories light the family's churning characters in full motionÄthey are jubilant, indomitable. Later, in "Home Movies" and "Driving," the Daley girls have grown up, following the current into middle-class America, no longer subject to the daily humiliations of the working-class poor. The final story presents three generations of women closely perceived, as they battle the cycle of life that is particularly female, burdened, courageous, kind and human. Agent, Jandy Nelson, Manus & Associates Literary Agency. (June) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


Google Preview