Cover image for Botany and healing : medicinal plants of New Jersey and the region
Title:
Botany and healing : medicinal plants of New Jersey and the region
Author:
Still, Cecil C., 1931-
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New Brunswick, N.J. : Rutgers University Press, [1998]

©1998
Physical Description:
xi, 261 pages : illustrations ; 26 cm
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780813525075

9780813525082
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library RS172.N67 S75 1998 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Summary

Summary

A description of nearly 500 species of plants found in the Garden State and in nearby areas, that have been used medicinally. The plants are listed by family, and for each entry the author discusses natural history, medicinal uses, habitat and preparations and applications by Native Americans.


Summary

Could that weed you just pulled have provided a cure for cancer? Scientists have warned that the destruction of the world's rain forests may mean that plant species are being lost before we recognize their potential as sources of new medicines. This is equally true for the plants much closer to home. New Jersey, while heavily industrialized and densely populated, is extraordinarily rich in plant resources. Botany and Healing: Medicinal Plants of New Jersey and the Region describes nearly 500 species of plants found in the Garden State and in nearby areas that have been used medicinally.

 Cecil Still lists plants by family and, within each family, by genus and species, to underscore the close relationships among medicinally valuable species. This arrangement is familiar to every botanist and easy for the amateur naturalist and herbalist to use as well. For each entry, Still discusses both the natural history and the historical and modern medicinal uses of the plant: scientific and common names, description, habitat, geographic range, and preparations and applications in Native American, European, African, and Asian herbal traditions. Most species are illustrated with Still's line drawings. The book also contains  a helpful index (with cross references by usage, common or scientific name), a glossary of terms, and a list of resources for further reading.

 Botany and Healing explains the history and present status of the uses of herbal medicines, explains what makes a plant medicinal (or poisonous), how herbal medicines are prepared for use, and why they should be used only with great caution.


Reviews 2

Choice Review

Still discusses medicinal properties and uses for about 495 species of plants found in New Jersey and the northeastern US. Each plant's scientific name and one or more common names are given. Ferns, gymnosperms, and angiosperms are included and arranged in alphabetical sequence by plant family, genus, and species. For each plant, a superficial description is given, and in many cases a line drawing is provided. In a few cases, several poisonous members of a family are discussed even though they may not occur in New Jersey without cultivation. Particular notation is made if and how the plants were utilized by the Iroquois or Cherokee Indians. There is an appendix listing medicinal problems and the plants used for that problem, a glossary of botanical and medical terms, a bibliography, and an index including scientific and common names. This volume is valuable for those who know the plant and want to know what it has been used for, or if a medical problem arises and a listing of plants utilized in its cure is needed. All levels. C. T. Mason Jr.; emeritus, University of Arizona


Choice Review

Still discusses medicinal properties and uses for about 495 species of plants found in New Jersey and the northeastern US. Each plant's scientific name and one or more common names are given. Ferns, gymnosperms, and angiosperms are included and arranged in alphabetical sequence by plant family, genus, and species. For each plant, a superficial description is given, and in many cases a line drawing is provided. In a few cases, several poisonous members of a family are discussed even though they may not occur in New Jersey without cultivation. Particular notation is made if and how the plants were utilized by the Iroquois or Cherokee Indians. There is an appendix listing medicinal problems and the plants used for that problem, a glossary of botanical and medical terms, a bibliography, and an index including scientific and common names. This volume is valuable for those who know the plant and want to know what it has been used for, or if a medical problem arises and a listing of plants utilized in its cure is needed. All levels. C. T. Mason Jr.; emeritus, University of Arizona


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